Italy

For Israeli Arabs and Jews, Soccer Puts Identity Politics In Play

Cultural tensions and overlaps on view in World Cup rooting interests.

06/29/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — At World Cup time, soccer fever is hailed as a cosmopolitan common denominator.

A café in the central square in Nazareth, is adorned with flags of World Cup favorites. Right, fans watch a match at Tel Aviv.

Gaza Flotilla Crisis Fuels Blockade Controversy for Israel

Left slams ‘collective punishment,’ as right hits Israel’s critics.

06/02/2010

Tel Aviv — The botched Israeli interception of a Gaza-bound blockade-buster flotilla ignited the usual Monday-morning quarterbacking in Israel:

Had the military prepared itself sufficiently for violent resistance? 

Did Israel lose the media war in the first hours when official spokespeople were silent for hours despite reports of fatalities on the ships?

The day after the flotilla raid, pro-Israel (left) and pro-Palestinian protestors rallied here. Michael Datikash | Getty Images

Sports Nicknames And The Jews

04/29/2005
Special to the Jewish Week

When an ethnic group or race endearingly becomes the nickname for a sports team, does that signal their arrival or shame? Native Americans have long decried the way sports fans have adopted tomahawk chops and tribal chants as ways to either root for or ridicule the Indians, Braves, and Redskins. On the other hand, the Irish don't seem at all bothered by Notre Dame's celebration of the poetry to their more pugnacious side.

When In Jewish Rome...

Five Towns teens participate in unique exchange program with Orthodox Jewish Italian peers.

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

‘Curious” was the word 17-year-old Blake Schulman used to describe how she felt as she left her home on Long Island for a week in Italy.
 
“I knew that the Italian kids were Orthodox, but I learned that they were so different than the Orthodox we know in the Five Towns,” she said.
 
After living in Rome with 16-year-old Giorgia Del Monte and her family, Blake said, “It was one of the best experiences of my life.”
 

The Long Island and Roman students pose atop the Renzo Levi Yeshiva, with the Vatican in the background.

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

An Italian Philosophy Inspires Jewish Preschools

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

On a recent winter morning the 130 children attending the nursery school at Manhattan’s Stephen Wise Free Synagogue are engaged in such hands-on projects as building a sukkah, maintaining a rooftop garden and creating small clay sculptures. Some have designed a replica of the Brooklyn Bridge, made from Styrofoam and other objects, while each class has met with a Jewish scribe to learn about a project that involves the entire congregation: the drafting of a Torah to mark the synagogue’s 100th anniversary.

 

A Little Sparkle For A Tough Year

12/22/2009

2009 has certainly been a memorable year of highs and lows:  From the inauguration of our first African-American president to a deepening recession that led to the highest level of unemployment in a generation; from the Yankees’ World Series win to the Madoff scandal losses. At the end of such a tumultuous year, I for one, plan to sit back and relax with a nice glass of wine. And times such as these, ideally, call for Champagne.

Young Iranian Jews Now Pushing Beyond Old Boundaries

Thirty years after the Revolution, a new generation here is breaking free of their parents’ insularity but holding onto their Persian heritage.

01/28/2010
Staff Writer

Arranged meticulously across a wooden dining table was a Shabbat meal that could have served 30 — fluffy gondhi, “Persian
Meatballs,” still steaming from their broth, Middle Eastern salads and ghormeh sabzi, a green vegetable stew. A Shabbat candle hovered between a spread of tahdig, a crispy rice dish, and shirini polo, a sweet rice blended with almond slivers, orange peels and pistachios.

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Israeli Team’s Efforts Stand Out In Haiti

As IDF rescuers and doctors save lives,
rare praise for a disproportionate response.

01/21/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Israel’s rapid response to the disaster in Haiti and the success of its experienced emergency team in saving many lives has drawn extensive media coverage, and has become a major source of pride in the Jewish community.

The Israel Defense Forces sent 220 personnel to the Caribbean island on Jan. 15, three days after a 7.0-scale earthquake devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and surrounding areas. The team included 40 doctors, 20 nurses and paramedics, search-and-rescue teams with trained dogs and other specialists.

Rescue workers on Jan. 15 carry an injured survivor of the earthquake in Haiti to the Israeli field hospital, where some 40 doct

In Rambam’s Footsteps

12/08/2009
Born Uriah Rapoport in Minsk, my grandfather changed his last name to Harris when he immigrated to the United States in the late 1870s at the age of 9. I was told he stayed with the Harris family only for one night, but kept their name for the rest of his life. I have nothing against the name Harris, but “Rapoport” connects me to a past before my grandfather. I looked up the name. There were many distinguished Ashkenazi rabbis named “Rapoport” in Eastern Europe, even in Minsk. My great-grandfather was not one of them: he was in the lumber business.
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