Haiti

Israel And The Tylenol Scare Of ‘82

A PR expert on the Goldstone report, Haiti and what Israel should learn about controlling its message.

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

In October of 1982, seven people in Chicago died under what at first seemed mysterious circumstances but quickly became linked to cyanide-laced Tylenol that had been placed on drugstore shelves. At the time Tylenol had a whopping 37 percent share of the painkiller market.

I mention it now, in the context of public relations for Israel, because the Tylenol Crisis, as it is called in the industry, is universally considered a benchmark case to study in terms of response to the kind of negative public relations that could have forced the company to fold.

Haiti: Our Disproportionate Response

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

In a world of rather frequent natural disasters, the earthquake in Haiti and its eerie, hellish aftermath retains the ability to shock, reminding us of the fragility of life and even civilization itself. And yet, if we will call earthquakes “acts of God,” there is some solace in seeing how so many of us have responded in a way that ironically can only be called the image of God and all that’s holy.

Opening Hearts, Wallets For Haitians

Jewish community here, in outpouring
of care, pitches in after quake.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

At a Jewish Y on Long Island, Jewish employees take up a collection for the families in Haiti of two maintenance men. In Brooklyn, members of the haredi Orthodox community hold a historic meeting with representatives of the borough’s Haitian-Americans. In southern Florida, a former New Yorker travels to Haiti on short notice to help the relatives of his Haitian-born employees.

The work of Israeli doctors in a makeshift army field hospital in Haiti. Getty Images

Israeli Team’s Efforts Stand Out In Haiti

As IDF rescuers and doctors save lives,
rare praise for a disproportionate response.

01/21/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Israel’s rapid response to the disaster in Haiti and the success of its experienced emergency team in saving many lives has drawn extensive media coverage, and has become a major source of pride in the Jewish community.

The Israel Defense Forces sent 220 personnel to the Caribbean island on Jan. 15, three days after a 7.0-scale earthquake devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and surrounding areas. The team included 40 doctors, 20 nurses and paramedics, search-and-rescue teams with trained dogs and other specialists.

Rescue workers on Jan. 15 carry an injured survivor of the earthquake in Haiti to the Israeli field hospital, where some 40 doct

More on Haiti: the good, the bad and the ugly

It’s no secret that great disasters bring out the best and the worst in people – the selfless rescuers who put their own lives on the line to save people they don’t know on one hand, the looters who use catastrophe as an opportunity for larceny, petty and otherwise, on the other.

So it is with the unimaginable tragedy in Haiti.

Haiti: Staring at Disaster

01/15/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

In the bad old days of the second intifada, when it seemed like every other day provided another incidence of a bomb blowing up somewhere in Israel with predictably horrific results, I remember hearing for the first time the concept that Israelis called a mega-pigu’a.

A pigu’a is the term they use for a terrorist attack.  A mega-pigu’a

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