Germany

Yom HaShoah 2010: The Cello, The Dress And The Autograph Book

Three new books explore the Holocaust through the prism of everyday objects

Jewish Week Book Critic
04/15/2010

Mundane objects can be the containers of powerful stories. Those objects take on a degree of holiness when they are infused with memory and loss, and are the only tangible connection to lives and times that are no more.

Three new books related to the dark history of the Holocaust, are connected to objects that have become priceless and symbolic: a cello, a child’s dress and an autograph book.

Time was out of the hands of labor camp inmates, but celloist Lev Aronson kept a life-saving beat in his head.

Günter Grass’ Skeletons

On the eve of his N.Y. reading, questions about morality, concealment and truth.

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Ah, to live in a confessional age. The fever to publicly acknowledge past mistakes is the latest craze of popular culture. Contrition, apparently, is in. With the television box as the new confessional booth, celebrities rush to repent on Larry King, Oprah and even Tyra — all as a means of public expiation and shrewd career management.

Preventing Genocide Is Easier Than Stopping It

04/13/2010

What could be more horrific than war?

In a gripping new documentary that aired Tuesday night on PBS to mark National Holocaust Remembrance Week, historian and author Daniel Jonah Goldhagen makes a convincing case that genocide — the systematic effort to eliminate an entire group perceived of as deserving of death — is even more destructive than armed conflict, and yet often can be prevented.

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A New Medium For Holocaust Stories

Part graphic novel, part documentary, ‘motion comics’
help attract viewers to difficult topics.

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The creators of “They Spoke Out: American Voices Against the Holocaust,” a new series of motion comics, can each talk about why that relatively new medium is best suited for telling the stories they chose — those of Americans who helped rescue Jews in the 1930s and ‘40s.

But perhaps no explanation is more compelling than the one offered by Neal Adams, a legend in the comic-book industry and the illustrator of the new series.

New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia’s forceful stance against Nazi Germany is told in “LaGuardia’s War Against Hitler.”

Preventing Genocide Is Easier Than Stopping It

What could be more horrific than war?

In a gripping new documentary airing on PBS on April 14, during National Holocaust Remembrance Week, historian and author Daniel Jonah Goldhagen makes a convincing case that genocide - the systematic effort to eliminate an entire group perceived of as deserving of death -- is even more destructive than armed conflict, and yet often can be prevented.

Remember Shelter In Shanghai

04/07/2010
Staff Writer

For the Jewish adults from Nazi Europe who spent some of their wartime years in a 40-square-block area of Shanghai, it was a difficult time. Low wages, if they had work. Crowded apartments. Disease and hunger.

For the kids, it was easier. They went to school and played.

For all, it was better than being back home under the swastika.

In Germany, Confronting the Nazi Perpetrators

04/01/2010
JTA

BERLIN (JTA) -- It isn't easy facing the cold stare of a Nazi perpetrator, even in a photo. Increasingly, however, memorial sites in Germany are making the confrontation possible, opening a door that long has been sealed.

A new exhibit at the former Ravensbrueck women's concentration camp in the ex-East German state of Brandenburg is the latest example.

The Seder’s Reminder Of Dawn

03/24/2010

Slavery, like the fog, comes in on cat’s feet. For all the analogies to the black experience, shackled suddenly in Africa and shipped on the Middle Passage, Jewish slavery and hard times through the years has been different; loss of freedom, dignity and destiny comes slowly, even gently, golden eras slipping into lesser ones, almost inexplicably, and undeserved.

Catholic Scholars To Pope: Slow Down On Pius Sainthood

Nineteen in letter voice ‘serious concerns’ about
fast-tracking of Shoah-era pope’s canonization.

02/25/2010
Staff Writer

The largely Jewish effort to slow down the proposed canonization of the pope who headed the Catholic Church during World War II has taken a more ecumenical tone.
Nineteen prominent Catholic scholars and theologians last week sent a letter to Pope Benedict XVI, urging him to put aside plans to declare Pius XII, the controversial pontiff during the Holocaust, a saint until historians gain full access to the Vatican’s wartime archives. The letter, intended as an internal Church document, was leaked to Reuters in Rome and subsequently made public.

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Lessons Of History

09/19/2003
Special to The Jewish Week

Frankfurt, Germany - Amsterdam has long been a place of education and remembrance of Anne Frank. But in her hometown of Frankfurt, Germany, Frank's life and death for years have been marked only with a plaque on one of her two former homes and an elementary school renamed in her honor. Annual ceremonies were held on her birthday from 1957 to 1970, but until now there has never been an ambitious permanent site dedicated to telling the story of one of the most famous and eloquent victims of the Holocaust.

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