Germany

Recalling A Shattered Past

10/30/1998
Staff Writer
For Karl Richter, the most vivid memory of November 1938 is the Jewish hospital in Mannheim, Germany. Rabbi of the city’s synagogue, he walked there with his wife on the morning of Nov. 10, after a night of anti-Jewish riots. The beds were full. “There were lots of people. Some jumped out of windows — with broken arms and legs.”

No Longer The ‘Nazis’

08/04/1999
Staff Writer
Eleven days in Germany provided an education for teachers who teach about the Holocaust. The group of 28 educators from Westchester and Rockland counties visited schools and memorials recently to observe how the genocide of World War II is taught in the land where it began. It was a trip marked by changes. Some of the teachers said their view of Germany — and of contemporary Germans — was changed by meetings with teachers and students. Others said they will bring a new perspective to their classrooms.

Another Sign of Rebirth In Germany

01/02/2008
Staff Writer
Like most of the Jewish communities of Germany, Bochum’s was nearly wiped out during the Holocaust. Its synagogue was destroyed on Kristallnacht, and only 33 of its more than 1,000 Jews returned after the end of World War II.

Arafat, Neville, Did More For Peace Than Obama

Friday, October 9th, 2009 I don’t get it, how did Obama get the peace prize and not Chamberlain? At least Chamberlain came home from Munich with a piece of paper. And don’t dismiss the prize because Arafat won it. Don’t compare Obama’s accomplishments to Arafat’s. That’s not fair to Arafat. At least Arafat had the Oslo Accords to show for himself.  (That’s pretty grim, when you compare Obama to Arafat and Arafat comes out more worthy of the prize.)

Dancing Camels On Gordon Beach

Sunday, September 13th, 2009

After some R&R time on the beach, as chronicled below, your wayfaring blogger got down to business and the reason he had come to Tel Aviv.

 

David Cohen, a fellow Brooklyn native, was hosting an End of Summer event for recent Nefesh B’Nefesh olim like himself on Gordon Beach, just a short walk from my hotel.

 

German Firms Pledge Payments

02/12/1999
Staff Writer
At least 17 German banks and industrial firms have agreed to contribute to a fund from which payments will be made to an estimated 100,000 Jews who served as slave laborers during the Holocaust, the German government announced this week. Needy survivors may also be entitled to payments from the fund. The government hopes the fund will begin making payments to survivors by Sept. 1, the 60th anniversary of Nazi Germany's invasion of Poland and the start of World War II, according to Elan Steinberg, executive director of the World Jewish Congress.

'Delayed Justice'

12/17/1999
Staff Writer
Under a $5.14 billion settlement reached Tuesday with Germany, Nazi slave laborers are expected to receive a one-time payment of about $10,000 in as early as six months, according to an attorney for many of the Jewish victims. The settlement was reached after yearlong talks between the German government and German industry, and Jewish groups and victims' lawyers.

Learning The Ropes On Compensation

11/12/1999
Staff Writer
A free comprehensive guide that describes the dozens of compensation and restitution programs available to Holocaust survivors is being made available by Jewish social service agencies nationwide. In the New York area, 13 agencies will be distributing the 50-page booklet prepared by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. It explains the current and pending restitution and compensation programs, the criteria for eligibility and how to apply.

Hofstra Paper Defends Revisionist Insert

11/05/1999
Staff Writer
Responding to outrage of ADL and others, editor claims booklet is protected under First Amendment. A 28-page booklet published by Holocaust denier Bradley R. Smith has touched off a controversy on the campus of Hofstra University in Hempstead, L.I., after the school newspaper became the first in the country to run it in last week's edition.
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