France

Editor’s Note

Jewish Week Book Critic
04/28/2010

 Chrystie Sherman took the cover photograph, “Shabbat,” in Bukhara, Uzbekistan, in 2002, as part of her “Lost Futures: Journeys into the Jewish Diaspora” project.  Her subject, dressed in a brocade Shabbat robe, opened the door of her family’s home to the photographer shortly before the onset of Shabbat. Later that evening, she hosted Sherman and 10 other guests for a traditional Bukharan Shabbat dinner of fragrant rice and lamb, in their courtyard under the stars. The young woman resembles the Sabbath bride of song.

lighting Shabbat candles at a DC-supported home for the aged for survivors of German concentration camps. Nice, France, 1951

French Rap Against Jews

03/25/2005
Staff Writer

Jewish groups are questioning the origin of a downloadable anti-Semitic rap song that has recently made its way to e-mail in boxes throughout France, where anti-Jewish sentiments have been on the rise in recent years.Dedicated to “the sons of Jewish whores,” the hateful tune, called “Nique les Juifs,” or “[Expletive] the Jews,” praises Hitler’s determination and compares Jews to cysts that must be removed or burned.

Building Bridges

03/11/2005
Staff Writer

When Pizmon, Columbia’s famed Jewish a cappella group, began to croon a series of Hebrew melodies, a group of about 100 French university students — visibly tired from their trans-Atlantic flight earlier in the day — roused and began clapping to the music, cheering, dancing and snapping photos of the singers.After each song, Pizmon received a standing ovation from the French student leaders who gathered Sunday in the basement of the Kraft Center, the home of Columbia University’s Hillel.“It was something very unexpected for us,” said Jimmy Pinto, a senior

Reaching Out In Battle Against Hate

12/24/2004
Staff Writer

In the highly charged political and religious climate of France, the country’s influential Jewish student union has been on the front lines of the fight to beat back hate.It made world headlines this year when it launched its controversial, and since pulled, advertising campaign with the words “Dirty Jew” scrawled in graffiti-like script over the images of Jesus and Mary.

Blast Doesn’t Destroy Vendors’ Resolve

11/05/2004
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — Tel Aviv’s Carmel Market is normally a cacophony of blaring Mediterranean music and bellowing produce merchants hawking a rainbow of produce. But on Monday, a Palestinian suicide bomber turned the open-air thoroughfare known in Hebrew as “the shuk” into a nightmare of screams and wailing sirens.

Jewish Agency To Soon Launch ‘Flex Aliyah’

01/02/2008
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Determined to continue to play a central role in aliyah at a time when the number of immigrants coming to the country is declining dramatically and as private immigration organizations like Nefesh B’Nefesh are expanding their activities and boasting their successes, the Jewish Agency for Israel will soon unveil a “flex aliyah” program for potential olim who do not necessarily want to live in Israel full time.

Common Artists, Uncommon Art

01/31/2003
Staff Writer

Its creative ranks include recluses, the insane and former prison inmates, but "Outsider Art" is hardly the exclusive domain of social misfits.

A tour through the American Museum of Folk Art or any number of galleries specializing in what is also known as "self-taught art" exposes viewers to a rich field of artists - including a notable number of Jewish painters - who, while untrained, display a talent for visual expression appreciated by connoisseurs and common folk alike.

N.J. Eyes Bill To Oust Baraka

10/11/2002
Staff Writer

New Jersey poet laureate Amiri Baraka says he will fight legislation aimed at removing him from the state-appointed position, telling The Jewish Week Tuesday he was prepared to take legal action if a bill being drafted this week in the state Senate passes. “I certainly will sue,” he said Tuesday by phone from his home in Newark.

Legal experts say the controversial poet could have a good case on free-speech grounds.

Calling All Jewish Superheroes

05/24/2002
Special To The Jewish Week

I recently experienced the Hollywood blockbuster "Spider-Man," and was delighted to see mild-mannered Queens high school student Peter Parker turn himself into a crime-fighting superhero. Jews invented the modern superhero 60 years ago, developing the concept of a well-intentioned but unempowered person transformed through accident into a powerhouse. Their creations (Superman, Spiderman and the like) are descendents of the golem, which was created to protect Jews from pogroms.

The Anxiety Of (Religious) Influence

01/24/2003
Special To The Jewish Week

It's a cliche to say that the world's major religions have long influenced and been influenced by each other. Jesus and his followers were Jewish; Maimonides was indebted to Islamic philosophers; Mohammad saw the Koran as an extension of Jewish and Christian texts; and so on. At a time like today (when the three monotheistic faiths feel deeply defensive about their place in the world) this message bears repeating.

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