Canada

Organizing on Iran, the Snowmageddon and More

03/14/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

As the snow melts away and the trees state to blossom, Jewish students nationwide are defining themselves through action. They’re doing Jewish things -- great Jewish things. You can read more about these inspiring stories below by clicking here.  Here’s a run-down of the biggest stories in Jewish student life.

Standing for Israel, One Campus at a Time

Sympathy For The Devil?

Old murder case solved; Orthodox Jewish reaction unresolved.

03/02/2010
Associate Editor

Long after a murder leaves the front page, it lingers in a kitchen grown quiet, or when dialing a phone forever unanswered, when private jokes stay private, and you say “all right” when people ask, but your seders aren’t the same, and Christmas isn’t Christmas, for mourners all share the same pew in pre-dawn sleeplessness.

Jonathan Mark

On A Mission For Israel

10/16/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Lynda Prince, a Native American from British Columbia, Canada, received more than a few curious stares last week when she explored the Israeli capital in Indian authentic garb.

Prince, who was in Israel to attend an annual evangelical Christian conference called the Feast of Tabernacles, wore a 30-pound deer-skin wedding dress and brightly colored feathered headdress during much of her visit, despite the sizzling autumn heat.

Winter Olympics Of Rabbinic Scandals Held In Vancouver; Rabbis Held In Contempt

02/23/2010

Alone won the overall individual competition, scoring highest in Most Shocking and Disturbing Revelation of the Year – in his case for alleged abuse of boys.

Dozens of lesser-known rabbis in the US, Canada and Israel tied for second in the fiercely contested category.

Rabbi Booshaw N. Chleemaw, chairman of the inaugural games, explained that he and his colleagues around the world felt that rabbinic scandals had become “so pervasive, sophisticated and significant” in recent years that they 

A Classroom For Principals

08/24/2000
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem - While their students savored every minute of summer vacation, an international group of senior educators spent part of their holiday break in an Israeli classroom. A varied mix of Hebrew day school professionals attended the Principal's Seminar on Jewish Education in the Diaspora at Bar Ilan University's Lookstein Center, which ran from July 10-24. Held partially on campus, partially in Jerusalem, the seminar afforded principals the ordinarily rare opportunity to share ideas with their peers, learn new strategies and assess their schools' strengths and weaknesses.

'Wartime' For Hitler

04/11/2003
Staff Writer

Just as they had won over some of their harshest critics, the people behind an upcoming miniseries about Adolph Hitler find themselves on the defensive again.

This week's TV Guide quotes Ed Gernon, who was executive producer of "Hitler: The Rise of Evil," as characterizing the German leader's ascent to power as a cautionary tale for Americans today.

Singing Praises

12/10/2004
Special To The Jewish Week

He was the last of the great cantors of the Golden Age and, perhaps, the greatest. So it is fitting that in their efforts to revive classic chazanut, Cantors World’s latest concert is a tribute to Moshe Koussevitzky. His brilliant tenor voice was stilled by death on Aug. 23, 1966, but for former students and colleagues, it still rings in their ears.
“His voice was like a violin, but with the strength of a pipe organ,” says Cantor Benjamin Siller.

Pressure Rising On Russia To Pay Pensions

06/01/2007

 For the first time, a high-level United States government delegation will travel to Moscow to press Russian officials to pay pensions to refugees and immigrants from Russia, and its predecessor, the Soviet Union, now living in the U.S., The Jewish Week has learned. News of the upcoming negotiations — which will be held in the Russian capital next week between a delegation from the U.S.

Daddy’s Not At The Shabbos Table

12/21/1999
Jewish Week Book Critic

There’s 22-year-old Emma saying the blessing over the Shabbat candles with her mother, delighted by the light, humming a synagogue tune and then covering her mother’s face with wet kisses. Together, Emma and Judith remember out loud all the people to whom they want to wish Shabbat Shalom. The pair could be an advertisement for Jewish living, and at first glance they hardly look unconventional or revolutionary. In fact, they’re pioneers in the — Jewish community, for there’s no daddy — at least, not yet — on their list of Sabbath greetings.

Yiddish Theater’s Last Leading Lady

At 98, Mina Bern was one of the few remaining stars from Second Avenue’s heyday.

01/22/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

She was one of the last supports of a world that was crumbling to pieces.

When Mina Bern died of heart failure last week at the age of 98, the Yiddish theater world mourned one of its leading lights, an indefatigable performer and champion of the Yiddish language whose career spanned three continents and virtually the whole of the 20th century.

Mina Bern was remembered this week for her indomitable will and star power.
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