Britain

Why Do They Hate Us?

06/29/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

All I hear about these days is the “New Anti-Semitism.” The Anti-Defamation League’s Abe Foxman had a book some years ago — a rather gevaltist book — with the Kahanist title “Never Again? The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism.” Phyllis Chesler had a book on the “New Anti-Semitism.” Even Alexander Cockburn, of all people, weighed in.

Delegates Walk Out on Ahmadinejad’s U.N. Speech

05/03/2010

NEW YORK (JTA) -- Delegates to a United Nations conference on nuclear proliferation walked out as Mahmoud Ahmadinejad began his speech, which attacked the United States and Israel.

The delegates from the United States, Britain, France, Hungary, New Zealand and the Netherlands left the room at the start of the Iranian president's address Monday.

Gauging The Fallout From British Expulsion

Action against Israeli diplomat could pave way for possible arrests of IDF officers in England.

03/24/2010
Staff Writer

Britain’s expulsion of an Israeli diplomat over the use of a dozen forged British passports in the killing of a Hamas terrorist in January means Israeli army officers could be arrested if they visit Britain, according to a specialist on the United Kingdom and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

David Kimche, Top Israeli Spy, Dies At 82

03/11/2010

(JTA) — David Kimche, the spy who played a key role in Israel’s 1980s entanglements with Iran and Lebanon, died Monday of brain cancer. He was 82.

Kimche, born in Britain, fought in Israel’s Independence War, and joined the fledgling Mossad by 1953 after reporting for a short period for the Jerusalem Post.

By the time Kimche retired as Mossad deputy director in 1979 to join the Begin administration as the Foreign Ministry’s deputy director, he had been involved in some of the Mossad’s greatest triumphs and worst failures.

Darkness After ‘Noon’

As a new biography shows, the second half of Arthur Koestler’s life, marked by a peculiar mix of Zionism and Jewish self-hatred, was one of steadily declining reputation.

01/22/2010
Staff Writer

If you were Jewish and lived in the 1940s, to say that Arthur Koestler was on your side was no small thing. Then at the height of his renown, Koestler, born in Budapest in 1905, had become one of Western literature’s most revered figures. His anti-Stalinist novel “Darkness at Noon,” published in 1940 and still his most famous, made him one of the first liberals to come out against Communism. The book would partly inspire George Orwell, an author whose reputation today far eclipses Koestler’s.

The new biography of Arthur Koestler by Michael Scammell, bottom, revives an overlooked thesis.

Trial Seen Likely For Iranian Jews

06/25/1999
Staff Writer
At the urging of leaders in the Iranian Jewish community here, American Jewish leaders this week suspended their public campaign calling for the release of 13 Jews accused of espionage in Iran. Instead, they are beginning to implicitly acknowledge the inevitability of a trial for the 13 by shifting their demands to the legal arena.

Wake-Up Call For Britain

05/30/2003
Staff Writer
British Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks was hardly surprised when it was revealed that the suicide bomber who murdered three people in a Tel Aviv jazz club April 30 was a British Muslim. "We have been warning the government for some years that extremist [Muslim] groups were operating in Britain, taking advantage of the extreme tolerance that Britain has," Rabbi Sacks said in a phone interview. "It isn't a complete surprise. But it is a wake-up call."
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