Yiddish

Symphony’s New Space

04/05/2002

The surplus capital of the indefatigable 1990s economy may be a memory, but its effects are still being felt in the ongoing expansion of many of New York’s cultural centers, from Jazz at Lincoln Center to the Brooklyn Museum.

Now this trend has reached all the way to West 95th Street. Symphony Space, once housed in an intimate but sticky-floored former skating rink, has recently completed a $12 million renovation. After a nearly two-year closure, the beloved performing arts group officially reopens April 8.

The Ties That Bind

06/18/2008
Rabbi David Wolpe is spiritual leader of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles.

As powerful as the bond that tied the Jewish people to God was the one that tied the Jewish people to one another.  Although Jews certainly quarreled — at times viciously — there was a depth to the care that Jews took of one another in ages past that should still touch and inspire us. In his memoirs, the great Yiddish writer Y.L. Peretz expresses it by capping a sad story with one, memorable line.

A Bissel Controversy

07/26/2002
Staff Writer
Vera Felice won't do nudity. She won't work on Shabbat. But the 21-year-old actress and model can do accents. A native of Copenhagen, the shapely blonde has no trouble slipping from thick-tongued Russian to saccharine Southern. For her next role, however, the recent graduate of the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute says she won't have to learn a new accent, "just a new language."

Symphony’s New Space

04/05/2002
Staff Writer
The surplus capital of the indefatigable 1990s economy may be a memory, but its effects are still being felt in the ongoing expansion of many of New York’s cultural centers, from Jazz at Lincoln Center to the Brooklyn Museum. Now this trend has reached all the way to West 95th Street. Symphony Space, once housed in an intimate but sticky-floored former skating rink, has recently completed a $12 million renovation. After a nearly two-year closure, the beloved performing arts group officially reopens April 8.

A Bear Of A Translation

06/23/2000
Staff Writer
There’s something different about the Hundred Acre Wood. Winnie-the-Pooh, Eeyore, Piglet and Christopher Robin are there, as they’ve been since A.A. Milne first published the now-classic children’s tale in 1926. This time, though, they’re searching for hunny and adventure in a language their proper British author surely never imagined his creations would speak — Yiddish. And this time they are Vini-der-Pu, Iya, Khazerl and Kristofer Robin.
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