UJA

From The Soviet Union To Salomon Brothers

06/21/1999
Jewish Week Book Critic

The copy of Leon Uris’ “Exodus” that Mark Tsesarsky read as a teenager was fragile, having passed through many hands before his. This was a samizdat copy, published underground and secretly circulated among Jews in the former Soviet Union. In the 1970s, reading it could have gotten Tsesarsky arrested, but, as he told Uris many years later as a new citizen of the United States, it made him “a Zionist in hiding.”

The Battery’s Up

01/02/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Battery Park City is a neighborhood made from scratch. Its 92 acres sit on landfill, soil excavated during the construction of the World Trade Center in the 1960s. Atop what used to be dilapidated piers, a village of high-rise and low-rise housing, plazas, playgrounds and pocket parks has arisen, with a population of about 10,000 people.

Opening Hearts, Wallets For Haitians

Jewish community here, in outpouring
of care, pitches in after quake.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

At a Jewish Y on Long Island, Jewish employees take up a collection for the families in Haiti of two maintenance men. In Brooklyn, members of the haredi Orthodox community hold a historic meeting with representatives of the borough’s Haitian-Americans. In southern Florida, a former New Yorker travels to Haiti on short notice to help the relatives of his Haitian-born employees.

The work of Israeli doctors in a makeshift army field hospital in Haiti. Getty Images

Across The Great Divide

03/23/2007
Staff Writer
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.

Where The Jewish Money Went

11/06/1998
Staff Writer
While a religiously split Jewish community was verbally sparring over which U.S. Senate candidate to support, many notables were putting their money where their mouth was. They were contributing to what is being considered the most expensive Senate race in history, with about $33 million being spent. At the same time they were looking to support the candidate they felt meshed best with their own interests, whether it be the ultra-Orthodox Jews of Brooklyn or the Conservative and Reform Jews of Manhattan.

Job Losses Mount for Well-Off in Community

11/18/2009
Staff Writer

Bob S., a 50-year-old computer specialist from Scarsdale, was laid off from his $175,000-a-year job in March after years of steady employment. He, his wife and their two children began living off the family’s savings, canceled their vacation plans and began eating all their meals at home.

Job seekers line up in Midtown outside a job fair. Middle- and upper-middle-class Jewish men appear to be among the hardest hit

Are Jewish Charity Execs Overpaid?

10/10/2003
Staff Writer
A new survey of executive compensation at non-profits shows that top professionals at federations and other Jewish groups are among the best-paid communal, human-services and international relief fund-raising organization leaders in the country.

After The Fall

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
When John Ruskay met with a major donor to UJA-Federation of New York Monday in the man’s Midtown office, multiple screens on his desk flashed with stock prices and minute-by-minute financial updates. Their first order of business was to talk about the volatility currently wreaking havoc in the hedge fund, credit and mortgage markets.

After The Fall

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
When John Ruskay met with a major donor to UJA-Federation of New York Monday in the man’s Midtown office, multiple screens on his desk flashed with stock prices and minute-by-minute financial updates. Their first order of business was to talk about the volatility currently wreaking havoc in the hedge fund, credit and mortgage markets.

Intifada Spurs Increased Giving

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
Four months before Hadassah was to kick off a major fund-raising campaign for an emergency medical center in Jerusalem, at the beginning of 2002, 9-11 happened. The American economy crashed. Americans donated their shrinking amount of charity dollars to the terrorist attack's relief effort. "We were scared to death," says Joyce Rabin, Hadassah's coordinator of development. Maybe the drive for the new hospital would fail.
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