New York Times

Shabbat Unplugged

-This morning at the JCC, I was hurriedly checking my email on my phone when an elderly gentleman came up to me and asked what I do with that "thing" on Shabbos.

King-Size Attraction

NBA’s Sabra rookie Omri Casspi, who faces the Nets next week, is big draw on and off the court. And he wears Number 18.

03/18/2010
Staff Writer

The game last month featured a pair of teams with losing records and sorry recent histories, but the seats behind one of the baskets at Madison Square Garden was crowded with scores of flag-waving, photo-snapping fans nearly two hours before tip-off between the New York Knicks and the visiting Sacramento Kings.

“I’m not a religious person. But I love to pray to God and celebrate all the holidays,” Omri Casspi says.

Iran sanctions hypocrisy

Politicians in both parties talk a tough game on Iran sanctions, but their toughness quickly evaporates when sanctions collide with corporate profits – as they inevitably do.

Levin gets Ways and Means, Stark dissed

This just in: Rep. Sandy Levin (D-Mich) will replace Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY) as chair of the powerful House House Ways and Means Committee, according to a New York Times news flash.

The Age Of ‘Slamming’

10/24/2002

Last Sunday’s New York Times declared that Jewish life on the Lower East Side was in its death throes. Meanwhile, a gathering at the historic Eldridge Street Synagogue proved that, at least in some corners, the neighborhood’s Jewish activity was not yet gone, just showing its age.

A group of about a dozen poets aged 65 and older, and an audience twice their number, had gathered in the 115-year-old sanctuary that mellow morning for the Eldridge Street Project’s second annual Poetry Slam for Seniors.

Doctorow’s Postmodern Jazz

03/03/2000
Jewish Week Book Critic

The one thing that most reviewers of E.L Doctorow’s new novel City of God (Random House) seem to agree on is that it’s an ambitious work. It’s an unusual, non-linear, non-smooth, rambling postmodern novel that takes on themes of God, science, religion, love, war, popular music, bird watching and movies; it’s also a novel about writing. Not always easy to follow, its several narrative lines and multiple speakers shift abruptly, and those readers who like their novels to have beginnings, middles and ends might find it difficult.

Giving Small, Making A Big Difference

12/07/2007
Special to The Jewish Week

The newspaper story gnawed at him.

How is it possible, Robert Ivker thought, that in a city as affluent as New York, Holocaust survivors from the former Soviet Union can live in such grinding poverty? This despite efforts by agencies like the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst (JCH) to provide hot meals, transportation to doctors, and free English-language instruction.

The Story That Won’t Go Away

02/06/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

Yesterday’s New York Times probably had more of substance about the Shoah on its front page than all the issues combined from the years of 1939-1945.

Two Papers, Two Stories; One Paper, Two Stories

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 Two papers tells a different story, or rather the same story in different ways. “Israeli Shells Kill 40 At Gaza U.N. School” (New York Times headline, Jan. 7).   Or was it, “Hamas In Human Shield Atrocity: Uses School As Mortar Lair Where Children Die” (New York Post headline, Jan. 7).

The NYT reports on anti-gay laws in Uganda

A disturbing article in today's New York Times reports on the impact of U.S. evangelicals, who have brought their anti-homosexual message to Uganda and at least indirectly contributed to the ongoing legislative push to make being gay a crime on a par with murder. The Times reports that the American evangelists “are finding themselves on the defensive, saying they had no intention of helping stoke the kind of anger that could lead to what came next: a bill to impose a death sentence for homosexual behavior.”
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