Judaism

Souls On Fire

11/27/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

The road less traveled is getting crowded. Not only are large numbers of Jews embarking on spiritual journeys, but many are writing about them, in full candor. The inner adventure story might be the Jewish book of the moment.

While bookstores are overflowing with memoirs of every stripe — the musings of people from all backgrounds, reflecting on remarkable families, abuse and dysfunction, divorce, relationships — Jewish writers seem to be revealing the details of their spiritual lives: The relationship frequently examined is that with God.

All The Rest Is Commentary — By Men

06/26/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, a voice for spirituality in non-Orthodox circles, devoted his earlier books to bringing God back into the lives of Jews, at synagogue and at work. Rabbi Salkin devotes his latest book to bringing Jews — the half of the Jewish people who have largely seemed lost from their tradition — back into Jewish life. Especially male Jews.

All The Rest Is Commentary — By Men

06/24/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, a voice for spirituality in non-Orthodox circles, devoted his earlier books to bringing God back into the lives of Jews, at synagogue and at work. Rabbi Salkin devotes his latest book to bringing Jews — the half of the Jewish people who have largely seemed lost from their tradition — back into Jewish life. Especially male Jews.

Sad Ending To Rescue Saga

10/14/2009

The final chapter in the three-decade saga of the rescue of Ethiopian Jews was thought to have been written in August 2008, when the last official airlift landed in Israel. But controversy, charges and counter-charges go on — now focused on the remaining Falash Mura, those Ethiopians who claim to be descendants of converts from Judaism and who seek to make aliyah to Israel.

The Old Country, America & The Snyders

06/21/1999
Staff Writer
Alex and Anna Nashbaum were typical Jews of their generation. They came to the United States from somewhere in Eastern Europe. Sometime before World War I. Freda Snyder, their daughter, does not know the details. “My parents would not open up about their past,” she says. “They wanted to make a new life in America.” Snyder knows this about her parents: they were Orthodox. Alex, a tailor, “was a shul-goer — all the time.” Anna, a homemaker, made a kosher home.

For German Converts, A New Home for the Soul

04/14/2009
Staff Writer

Trekking through ice-coated fields in a brutally cold Russian October, Lt. Arthur Wollschlaeger pressed on, as he and his swastika-emblazoned companions conquered the western Russian city of Orel — another victory for the unrelenting German Werhmacht infantry. He had earlier taken part in invasions of Poland, Holland and France — a World War II military career that began when he first entered the Czechoslovakian Sudetenland, in 1938.

Bernd Wollschlaeger, carrying the Torah, broke from his parents to become a Jew.
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