JDC

In The Cyclone’s Wake

05/21/2008
Staff Writer
A veteran of international relief work for the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Amos Avgar has a set routine when he leaves for points overseas. He gets a visa, makes his hotel reservations, checks that his inoculations are up to date, does some research and puts a "Lonely Planet" travel guide in his suitcase. And, if the country where he is headed may pose some dangers, he kisses the front-door mezuzah on his apartment in southern Jerusalem. Two weeks ago Avgar kissed his mezuzah.

This Year In Belgrade

04/25/2003
Staff Writer
Belgrade: "Don't be offended," said the rabbi's wife on the telephone, "but..." It was the part after the "but" that had me worried.

WJC Hot Seat For JDC Vet?

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
In the late 1970s the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, the New York-based organization that supports Jewish life in small communities around the world, needed someone to head its office in Tehran. Two JDC staffers told Ralph Goldman, the Joint’s executive vice president, that he should consider Michael Schneider, a social worker in London. After a four-hour interview with Schneider, a native of South Africa who left his homeland to escape arrest for anti-apartheid activities, Goldman offered him the job in Iran.

The Next Round In Buenos Aires

04/12/2002
Staff Writer
Buenos Aires — At first glance, the once-thriving capital of Argentina looks as thriving as ever. The downtown commercial area, near the banks of the Rio de la Plata river, is filled with people. The shelves of the upscale shops are stocked with the latest goods. The city’s distinctive yellow-and-black taxis cruise the streets. But at second glance …

‘It Brings Back The Horror’

04/16/1999
Staff Writer
Amir Shaviv didn’t make his first business call on Tuesday until mid-morning — Central European time. At 4:30 a.m. New York time, he was on the phone to Jerusalem and Budapest, from his Manhattan apartment.

WJC Hot Seat For JDC Vet?

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
In the late 1970s the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, the New York-based organization that supports Jewish life in small communities around the world, needed someone to head its office in Tehran. Two JDC staffers told Ralph Goldman, the Joint’s executive vice president, that he should consider Michael Schneider, a social worker in London. After a four-hour interview with Schneider, a native of South Africa who left his homeland to escape arrest for anti-apartheid activities, Goldman offered him the job in Iran.
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