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This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’
offers game-filled Jewish
education with a soft sell
for 4- to 10-year-olds.

03/05/2010
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.
A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

A Jewish Club Penguin? Created by an Israeli for-profit.

This JLand Is Your Land

New ‘virtual world’ offers game-filled Jewish education with a soft sell for 4- to 10-year-olds.

03/02/2010
Associate Editor

‘Mommy, are you done with your e-mail yet?” my 6-year-old daughter Ellie demands, hovering behind me in our study.

 

A few months earlier she’d have been asking because she wanted my attention. Now, however, she’s interested in something far more alluring: the computer, specifically JLand, an online Jewish “virtual world” for kids, where she has already logged countless hours, earned hundreds of virtual gold coins and mastered various educational games.

 

A Jewish Club Penguin?  JLand is considerably more sophisticated and ambitious than other Jewish computer games.

Luring The Young And The Upscale

02/06/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Most of the 750 young adults who packed a cavernous room in Manhattan’s Puck Building last week wouldn’t have come near a UJA-Federation of New York event three or four years ago, one of the function’s organizers said. And half of those who came last week, he added, will never again be seen by federation leaders.

Jewish Ethics On Facebook

03/18/2009
Staff Writer
Imagine you have a needy relative who’s always hitting you up for money. The person’s a nudge, irresponsible, undependable and ungrateful. Should you keep loaning that person your money? That scenario has been a hot topic on the Internet for a month. It’s the first “moral dilemma” posed on “The Jewish Ethics Project,” a new Facebook group established by Rabbi Joseph Telushkin.

Along Together

04/09/2008
Rabbi David Wolpe is spiritual leader of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles.

Since we have destroyed the experience of solitude — the television hums, and you can chat with a hundred people online and believe you have a community — we are making it far too easy to be alone. It is now harder to risk the real friction of closeness and relationship. Why trouble yourself when you can have a smooth, deleteable friendship online with someone you need never really know?

The God Of OMG!

01/26/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Just before the December vacation, I challenged my class of seventh graders to keep count of how often the expression “OMG!” appears in text messages, Facebook postings, tweets, e-mails or other communications that they send and receive. When they returned in January, I was amazed — but not surprised — and what they reported: nearly 250 OMG!s were recorded among the dozen or so who participated. That’s over 20 OMG!s per person, or about two a day over the span of the vacation.

At Limmud NY, Too Much Of A Good Thing

01/26/2010
Associate Editor

Last week, after years of contemplating it but being stymied by various logistical challenges, I finally made it, with my two daughters in tow, to Limmud NY.

On the ride there Friday, as our bus ascended the curving mountain road to the Catskills hotel where this Jewish learning festival/conference would be held, 3-year-old Sophie sent me into a fit of soul-searching that would throw me off for the entire weekend.

At Limmud NY, Too Much Of A Good Thing

01/28/2010
Associate Editor

Last week, after years of contemplating it but being stymied by various logistical challenges, I finally made it, with my two daughters in tow, to Limmud NY.
On the ride there Friday, as our bus ascended the curving mountain road to the Catskills hotel where this Jewish learning festival/conference would be held, 3-year-old Sophie sent me into a fit of soul-searching that would throw me off for the entire weekend.

The God Of OMG!

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Just before the December vacation, I challenged my class of seventh graders to keep count of how often the expression “OMG!” appears in text messages, Facebook postings, tweets, e-mails or other communications that they send and receive. When they returned in January, I was amazed — but not surprised — and what they reported: nearly 250 OMG!s were recorded among the dozen or so who participated. That’s over 20 OMG!s per person, or about two a day over the span of the vacation.

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