The star

Mets’ Kosher Vendor Reportedly Sues To Open On Shabbat

06/15/2010

The Star-K kashrut certification company denied this week that it gave Kosher Sports, Inc., a company with concessions at seven sports stadiums in the eastern United States, permission to keep its trio of stands at the New York Mets’ ballpark open on Shabbat.

The New York Post reported that Kosher Sports, based in Englewood, N.J.,last week sued the Mets in Brooklyn’s Federal Court, claiming that the team has barred the firm from selling its products at Citi Field during Friday night and Saturday games while Star-K agreed to let them stay open.

Hungary Cites Schneier As Noble Survivor

06/01/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The consul general of Hungary in New York paid tribute to Rabbi Arthur Schneier of Park East Synagogue on his 80th birthday recently. The rabbi, a native of Vienna, survived the Holocaust as a 15-year-old refugee in Budapest when 600,000 Hungarian Jews perished.

“He could have come away from the Budapest ghetto hating not only the Nazis but the Germans, the Hungarians in general—many of his survivors have,” said Consul General Viktor Polgar.

Elisabeth and Rabbi Arthur Schneier with Hungarian Consul General Viktor Polgar. Photo by Tim Boxer

The Jewish Picasso Of Tremont

In a gritty Bronx neighborhood, a 91-year-old retired lamp manufacturer pumps out enough ‘outsider’ art for a museum.

04/20/2010
Staff Writer

Hidden behind rows of shoddy warehouses, auto-repair junkyards and single-room-occupancy tenements, the Museum of the People of the World is largely invisible to the sporadic passersby in its gritty Bronx location, just east of the Grand Concourse and down the hill from the jagged bedrock of Tremont’s Echo Park.

The museum of what, you say? Where?

In a city of museums — from one on sex to one on biblical art — you won’t find this one in any museum index or listing, in print or online.

Herbert Lagin stands before his 9/11 memorial. Inset: Abstract painting suggests the Holocaust.  Sharon Udasin

Feeling The Latin Beat

08/09/2002
Staff Writer
Charly Rodriguez plays Latin jazz. So does Charly Schwartz: which may come as a surprise to his fellow band members in La Onda Va Bien. Schwartz and Rodriguez are the same person: the Brooklyn-born son of Cuban Jewish immigrants who raised him on equal parts Havana rhythms and "Hava Nagila."  

A Star Of David

08/27/1999
Staff Writer
When 15-year-old Ryan Green wore his new Star of David necklace to the first day of class at Harrison Central High School in Gulfport, Miss., it drew the attention of wary school officials. The school superintendent, backed by the entire local school board barred the carrot-topped, freckle-faced boy from wearing the silver pendant, citing a school policy that prohibits students from wearing gang symbols. The case swiftly gained national attention, spurring a federal lawsuit, charges of anti-Semitism and raising new questions about religious freedom in public schools.

Mourning Online

04/27/2007
Staff Writer
A few dozen friends of an elderly Jewish woman who died in February were not able to come to her funeral service at the Plaza Jewish Community Chapel on the Upper West Side, but they joined the mourners, virtually, via the Internet. In cities across the United States and Europe, were the first people to take part in a new service: funerals carried live, or archived, on the Internet’s broadcasting, aka “streaming,” technology.

Minnesota Mishegoss: Coleman - Franken Contest Still Undecided

Sunday, December 7th, 2008 James Besser in Washington In Minnesota, as it turns out, a recount won’t be enough to determine the winner of a hotly contested Senate race.   The only thing that’s certain: the  winner will definitely be a Jewish guy from New York.
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