Washington, D.C.

Jews Still Can’t Find J Street In Washington

02/26/2010

After almost two years of existence, J Street, a left-wing political peace movement, still cannot be found on any pro-Israel map of Washington, D.C. Google maps and GPS are equally unable to identify the controversial lobby. “I’m sorry I don’t think there is a J street in D.C.,” said a confused Zionist tourist checking his map again.

“Did you say it was pro-Israel? Nope, I got nothing here.” Map officials say that J Street can be found on pro-Palestinian maps of Washington, though.

What’s Jewish At The MLA?

01/19/2001
Staff Writer

Washington, D.C. — Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe had just begun hitting the shores in 1883 when a small group of American professors founded the Modern Language Association to advocate tongues other than ancient Greek and Latin. But they probably weren’t thinking of Yiddish, Hebrew or Ladino.

Being Real

01/05/2001
Staff Writer

Growing up was never easy for copper-skinned Rebecca Walker, the trophy baby of a new America. Born in 1969, the “Movement Child” of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and activist Alice Walker and civil rights lawyer Mel Leventhal, Walker spent the first two decades of her life failing to fit into a country that still assumes fixed racial categories.

Jewish Activism At Its Best

11/30/2007

 Next Thursday will mark the 20th anniversary of the highlight of American Jewish activism, the massive rally in Washington, D.C. on behalf of Soviet Jewry. Looking back, there is a wistful quality to the event because the unity of cause reflected that day has not been equaled since by our community.

Global Chanukah Groove

11/28/2007

The buzzword in business circles is synergy. That’s what JDub Records was looking for when the not-for-profit label began to think about its third annual Chanukah event. And when Rabbi Daniel Brenner, the vice president for education at the Birthright Israel Foundation, told JDub heads Aaron Bisman and Jacob Harris that he was interested in doing a project with them, the buzz of synergy filled the air.

A Friendly Visitor

Program links volunteers
with elderly Holocaust survivors.

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

As Sandra Glicksman walked towards the private room of Inge Heilbrunn in the Grace Plaza Nursing Center in Great Neck, Heilbrunn was in a wheelchair anxiously awaiting her arrival.

Heilbrunn, an 85-year-old widow and Holocaust survivor, was visibly upset. Jewelry that she had kept in her Scrabble box was missing.
“I’ve looked all over,” Heilbrunn said, beside herself. “It’s gone. Somebody took it. ... It meant a lot to me.”

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The Way They Lived

11/20/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

One of the most striking exhibits in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., is the three towers of photographs taken in Eishyshok, documenting that shtetl’s Jewish life before it was destroyed by the Nazis. Viewers are encircled by 1,600 photographs collected by Dr. Yaffa Eliach, a professor at Brooklyn College who was born in Eishyshok. Now, Eliach has published a book that links together the moments captured in the photographs, presenting a full and textured description of the once vital community: It is a work about one town, with clues to many pasts.

The Mourning Son

10/02/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

"For many years I had lived without religion. But I could not have lived without the possibility of religion,” Leon Wieseltier writes in “Kaddish.”

Mondrowitz Extradition Ruling Raising Questions

01/29/2010
Special to The Jewish Week

The Israeli Supreme Court’s recent ruling that alleged child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz could not be extradited to the U.S. has generated strong reactions from child advocates here and in Israel, and raised questions from legal experts about both the ruling itself and how the case unfolded over the past 25 years.

Mondrowitz Extradition Ruling Raising Questions

Israeli Supreme Court decision leaves child advocates angry;
decision focusing attention on time elapsed between extradition requests.

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The Israeli Supreme Court’s recent ruling that alleged child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz could not be extradited to the U.S. has generated strong reactions from child advocates here and in Israel, and raised questions from legal experts about both the ruling itself and how the case unfolded over the past 25 years.

Alleged child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz during his arrest in Israel in 2007. Getty Images
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