Warsaw

Off-Campus Awakening

09/04/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Eli Sanders, an incoming senior at Columbia University, never gave much thought to campus anti-Semitism — that is, until a fellow student submitted a controversial article to the Columbia Daily Spectator.

“It was an opinion piece, and it said that the hands of the Jews are stained in blood,” Sanders, the paper’s chief editor, recalls during a tour of the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem.

Polanski Gets Personal

12/13/2002
Staff Writer

Roman Polanski's latest feature film is a dramatic account of one man's survival in wartime Warsaw. "The Pianist," which opens Dec. 27, is also a documentary in at least one respect: its star, Adrien Brody, nearly starved himself to portray the Jewish musician and composer Wladyslaw Szpilman, shedding some 30 pounds from his already slender frame as filming progressed.

Shooting The Resistance

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Aleksander Ford was a Jewish-Polish filmmaker whose career summed up the bloody 20th century. He enjoyed one of the rare happy endings, thanks to a mixture of luck and foresight, but it is clear from his best film, “Border Street” (1949), that he knew all too well how rare his good fortune was. “Border Street,” which will have a rare U.S. showing on Nov. 18, was the first fiction feature to attempt to portray the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, and Ford undoubtedly knew many of the men and women who had perished in the flames that engulfed the ghetto.

The Hero Of An Israeli Best Seller

09/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

When Ram Oren, the Israeli author likened by much of his country to John Grisham, learned of Michael Stolowitzky’s story, he was faced with a choice: He could turn the tale into a work of fiction, like 17 of his previous 20 books, or treat it as history.

But Oren found the choice surprisingly easy.

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

04/03/2009

At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

Time’s Excellent Coverage Of The Shoah - 1943

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008 Despite all the apologists, anyone in the United States during the 1940s, particularly a Jew, who said that he or she had no idea about the Holocaust was either an idiot or illiterate. Despite all the attacks on the media for not telling everything, and for not telling it on the front page, any person who read Time magazine, the number one newsweekly in 1943, was given all the information required to know that an extermination was underway that was unparalleled in history.  

Sunset, Sunrise

Special To The Jewish Week
12/08/2009
The most beautiful sunset I have seen in my life was above the rolling hills of Majdanek, a Nazi concentration camp in Poland. Orange grabbed peach, peach wrapped its legs around crimson, until all was gold, gold hovering over our weeping circle of Jews, gathered there to witness the worst of humanity. I was 18, out of America for the first time and thoroughly captivated by Poland, by its dark history but also by its Jewish renaissance, embodied that day in the radiant sunset.

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

Long before Starbucks, or even Tel Aviv, cafés played a key role in fostering (and caffeinating) Jewish literary and intellectual communities.

04/03/2009
At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

A Brooklyn Brew Of Jewish And Montessori

In Prospect Heights, the Luria Academy tweaks traditional Jewish learning with a questioning, open-minded approach.

01/16/2009
Staff Writer
Deep in the bowels of a Prospect Heights apartment building that looks just like any other in this trendy neighborhood, down a long, winding hallway flanked on either side with burnished doors, 30 young children spend their days learning how to learn.

From Sondheim To South Africa

06/13/2003
Staff Writer
The Tony awards passed him by on Sunday, but director Lonny Price is having an exceptional year on Broadway. He directed what critics panned as one of the season's stinkers, the musical version of the 1980 honky-tonk film "Urban Cowboy." When the show closed in May after 60 performances, Price seemed nonplussed. "It just wasn't a New York show, it turned out," he said.
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