Vienna

Rebuilding A Shattered Past

12/26/1997
Jewish Week Book Critic

It’s not unusual for strangers to tell Helen Epstein that she changed their lives. They’re referring to her 1979 book, “Children of the Holocaust,” which identified and described an experience that many sons and daughters of survivors shared but few discussed in public. After 18 years, that book — her first — remains in print, still selling.

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

04/03/2009

At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

Miep Gies And Saintliness

01/15/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The question Roman Catholics throughout the world should be asking themselves this week is why there hasn’t been more talk about someday making Miep Gies a saint.

Miep Gies: Knighted by the Netherlands, honored by Yad Vashem, she offers the Catholic Church a true example of sainthood.

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

Long before Starbucks, or even Tel Aviv, cafés played a key role in fostering (and caffeinating) Jewish literary and intellectual communities.

04/03/2009
At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

MUSIC

02/13/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Resurrection: Two classical ensembles and a new Web site pay tribute to the music of the Shoah. Holocaust scholars and intellectuals in allied fields have argued for most of the past six and a half decades whether there was such a thing as a cultural resistance to the Shoah. Did creating works of art in the confines of Terezin constitute a rebuke to the Nazis or an unwitting submission? In the face of such brutal inhumanity, how powerful a subversive act could a piece of music, a painting or a performance be?

Austria To Help Restore Jewish Cemeteries

12/24/2009
Staff Writer

(JTA) —  Austria’s government will give $28.6 million to restore Jewish cemeteries in the country.
The cemeteries were abandoned and looted after Austria joined the Third Reich in 1938.
The decision came late Monday evening during a meeting of Austrian officials and Ariel Muzicant, president of Vienna’s Jewish community.
The money pledged by Austria will be distributed over 20 years. The Jewish community will raise a matching $28.6 million from citizens and outside donors, Bloomberg reported.

Stranger No More

01/17/2003
Staff Writer
With his odes to Italian restaurants and songs about Catholic girls, most Billy Joel fans may never have pegged the "Piano Man" for the scion of a once-thriving German-Jewish mercantile family whose fortunes were swept away in the Holocaust.

High-Tech History

09/20/2002
Staff Writer
Edward Serotta read Basya Chaika's life story for the first time a few weeks ago. Sitting in his Vienna office, he learned how Chaika, a 16-year-old loyal communist at the end of 1943, had served on a secret military tribunal in Kiev, sentencing to death Ukrainian traitors and collaborators who had worked with the occupying Nazi army. An employee of Serotta's Central Europe Center for Research and Documentation had interviewed Chaika, who still lives in Kiev. Serotta was editing her story.

Bringing Justice To War Criminals

12/08/2006
Staff Writer
In the 1970s, Elliot Welles, a Holocaust survivor who had become a successful restaurant owner in Manhattan, scheduled an appointment with two executives of the Anti-Defamation League. He wanted to propose that the ADL establish a unit to hunt down fugitive Nazis.

To World, Kollek Was Jerusalem

01/05/2007
Staff Writer
Jerusalem — A visitor handed Teddy Kollek a book to autograph several years ago. Kollek, sitting behind his desk in the office of The Jerusalem Foundation, where he worked as international chairman after losing a race for re-election as the city’s mayor in 1993, looked at the cover — the book, distributed by the foundation, was a collection of writings and photographs from his career. “Where did you get this?” Kollek asked.An assistant said she had given it to the visitor.
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