Tel Aviv

Israel Education Gets Failing Grades

11/20/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Tens of thousands of Israelis took the streets of Tel Aviv on Saturday night to show solidarity with striking secondary school teaches and to demand sweeping reforms in the educational system. The strike has gone on for more than a month.

Speaker after speaker lamented the sorry state of the nation’s schools and facilities and called for more classroom hours and smaller classes.

Haredi Hooligans

11/15/2007
Israel Correspondent

Beit Shemesh — The haredi neighborhood of Ramat Beit Shemesh “Bet” has clean, wide streets and neat white residential buildings that house large families devoted to Torah study. Wherever you go, it seems, mothers in long-sleeved, below-the-knee dresses and dark headscarves push single or double strollers, their children well fed and smiling.

Despite the outward appearances of calm, Bet, the most religious section of Beit Shemesh, a thriving municipality between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, has been dealing with a war that shows no signs of abating.

Finding Jobs, And Hope, For Ethiopian Gen-Xers

Small Israeli group is having big impact in helping university grads find jobs, beat back bias.

02/25/2010
Editor And Publisher

Until she was in her early 30s, Yifat Ovadia, an Ashkenazi native of Beersheba, veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and university graduate, had never met an Ethiopian Jew.

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For Israelis, How Far To Go?

07/21/2006
Jewish Week Correspondent

JERUSALEM How many casualties are too many casualties? How much destruction is too much destruction? And how long should Israel continue its military assault on Hezbollah targets in Lebanon in order to achieve at least part of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert’s stated goal of destroying “every terrorist infrastructure, everywhere?”

A Bard For Uncertain Times

01/24/2003

The cover illustration of Etgar Keret's first book in English shows a smiley-faced figure in the act of blowing its brains out. Inside, suicide, murder and other forms of mutilation are featured in a good portion of the "other stories" in "The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God and Other Stories."

Far from turning off readers, Keret's combination of bittersweet prose and morose subject matter has hit a nerve among Israelis born in an age of political and moral uncertainty.

Don’t Ease Up On Iran

12/14/2007

 

Question: who has more credibility in strategic and military analysis these days: Washington or Jerusalem?

The question is especially important, as the U.S. and Israel seem to have drawn different conclusions about the imminent threat of Iran developing nuclear weapons.

No Two Documentaries Are Alike

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

The second week of the New York Jewish Film Festival is heavily weighted towards documentaries, but these days that label covers such a huge swatch of territory that you can’t know what to expect. The movies included in this year’s event are no exception to the trend toward the unconventional in nonfiction cinema.

Global Chanukah Groove

11/28/2007

The buzzword in business circles is synergy. That’s what JDub Records was looking for when the not-for-profit label began to think about its third annual Chanukah event. And when Rabbi Daniel Brenner, the vice president for education at the Birthright Israel Foundation, told JDub heads Aaron Bisman and Jacob Harris that he was interested in doing a project with them, the buzz of synergy filled the air.

New Push For Reform Immigration To Israel

07/13/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Rabbi Andrew Davids, executive director of the Association of Reform Zionists of America, makes no secret of the challenges his group faces as it tries to increase aliyah, or immigration to Israel, within the Reform movement.

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