Tel Aviv

What Summit?

11/28/2007
Staff Writer

Tel Aviv — “A new beginning.”

The post-Annapolis proclamation ran as the banner headline on Israel’s largest selling daily, Yediot Ahronot.

But on the sun-bathed morning after the Rothschild Coffee Spot — the café kiosk hub of Tel Aviv’s most lively boulevard — few chose to let the first renewal of peace talks in seven years distract them from their morning java.

A Different Exodus From Egypt

10/31/2007
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — The iconic but crumbling Bauhaus building just off the Ayalon freeway in south Tel Aviv resembles the bridge of a ship, a tribute to the Jewish immigrants who reached pre-state Israel in boats.

In the last three months, an abandoned basement pub and a construction site at the same building have become a makeshift absorption center for dozens of illegal African migrants and an embodiment of Israel’s most sensitive immigration dilemmas as the state nears its 60th anniversary.

Bibi: Still Committed To Oslo

09/18/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Monday that Israel has no choice but to adhere to the Oslo peace accord, despite the fact that he considers it a “flawed deal.” Speaking to a group of journalists representing Jewish newspapers, Netanyahu said that Israel is committed to carrying out a second redeployment under the treaty’s interim stage. To do otherwise, he said, could jeopardize the country’s international treaties with other nations.

Making A Push For Personal Freedom

07/17/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — During Passover week, Amira Segev decided to buy a pack of chewing gum at a local supermarket. When she arrived at the cash register, however, the cashier refused to ring up the purchase.

“I can’t sell this to you because it’s not kosher for Passover,” the young cashier told Segev apologetically. “The law says we can only sell Passover food during Passover.”

A Jarring Jubilee

05/08/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The schism between religious and secular Israelis has never been wider, the rate of unemployment is soaring and the peace process is nearly on life support.

So what prompted Ziva Moshe, a 44-year-old mother of four, to celebrate Israel’s 50th anniversary with unabashed pride and a traditional barbecue?

“It’s a holiday, a beautiful sunny day and I’m happy,” said Moshe, who like hundreds of thousands of other Israelis congregated in the nation’s parks on Israeli Independence Day.

Back To The Brink

02/06/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Yossi Oren says he isn’t worried that Iraq will attack Israel with conventional, biological or chemical weapons.

“The situation is a lot better now than it was seven years ago,” asserts the 43-year-old Jerusalemite, referring to the 1991 Gulf War. During that six-week battle, Iraq lobbed 39 Scud missiles at Israel.

“Today,” Oren continues, “Israel has more sophisticated tools to destroy missiles. And anyway, I don’t think any Scuds will fall.”

Calm Before The Storm?

02/20/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — As Israelis lined up at hardware stores this week to buy plastic sheeting and rolls of adhesive tape to seal rooms against possible chemical or biological agents, Liora Abramson was taking things in stride — for now.

“We’re feeling really, really calm. If it weren’t for the news reports on TV, I wouldn’t know that a war might be looming,” said Abramson, 21, whose family moved from Borough Park, Brooklyn, to Tel Aviv eight years ago.

Drumbeat Grows Louder For Lebanon Withdrawal

12/04/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The sun is beginning to set, and Efrat Spiegel, who has traveled to the capital from her home near Tel Aviv, feels a chill.

“It was warm in Tel Aviv and it didn’t occur to me to bring a sweater,” says the 65-year-old telephone operator, shivering outside the Prime Minister’s Office.

A Friend In The Holy Land

07/28/2000
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — When his parents began to suffer health problems that made it difficult for them to continue living in Israel, Bruce Markowitz got busy.

Believing that his folks might have to return to the United States, he contacted a number of New York-area geriatric care-management agencies that arrange everything from meals on wheels and home medical visits to property management and round-the-clock nursing care.

A House Divided, A House United

06/21/1999
Israel Correspondent

Ramle — The industrial zone of this working-class Jewish-Arab city between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv is home to numerous car-repair shops, gas stations and factories. The streets are lined with broken glass and litter, the sidewalks with fancy cars awaiting a muffler or tune-up.

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