Tel Aviv

Graffiti For Israel On Display in New York, Tel Aviv

05/25/2010
Staff Writer

Spray-paint stencil artist Sarah Brega recently found inner peace at the unlikeliest of places — a series of Sderot bomb shelters she had decided to spruce up.

“It was really peaceful in Sderot — I picked two or three bomb shelters to decorate,” Brega said. “It was like my dream, to have this empty canvas and do whatever I want with it.”

Sarah Brega’s spray-paint and stencil piece of Herzl, Ben-Gurion and Jabotinsky, hangs in the Eden Gallery in Tel Aviv.

Small-Scale Death Camp: Holocaust Portrayed Through Puppetry

05/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Susan Feldman has been to Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland. But when the artistic director of St. Ann’s Warehouse traveled to the small Dutch city of Leeuwarden, she saw the concentration camps again — in miniature.

There, the theater group Hotel Modern was performing “Kamp,” an installation using thousands of three-inch tall, handcrafted puppets to re-enact life — and death — in Auschwitz.

Auschwitz in miniature: The puppet play "kamp."

Bad Blogger, Good Jew?

I’ve been a very bad blogger recently (a whole week without posting), but a very good Jew: in the past 10 days, I’ve gone to services at three congregations, and attended a Storahtelling event. Plus, this Saturday morning I’ll be in shul (a fourth one!) yet again, for my niece’s bat mitzvah.

Those who pray three times a day, or are at least weekly shul-goers, may laugh at such modest accomplishments. Indeed, I’m sure someone will send me a nasty e-mail or post a comment saying this (along with being intermarried) is further evidence of my moral laxity. Nonetheless, for me, four synagogues in two weeks — not during the High Holidays — is something of a record.

How Green Is My Landfill

05/20/2009
Staff Writer

Just southeast of Tel Aviv, a huge mountain peak looms over the highway below, harboring swarms of flies and wafting scents of decaying garbage down its sprouting hills. The manmade mound — called Hiriya — may contain a colossal pile of trash, but the landfill is quickly becoming Israel’s icon of environmentalism: a space to recycle waste, produce energy and cultivate greenery. 

Part of the state-of-the-recycling effort at the site

Love Bubble

We got off work for 'Yom Yerushalyim' so naturally, I left Jerusalem and headed straight for Tel Aviv.

I hate crowds. And zealotry.

But I also hate beaches. What's a girl to do?

My girlfriend, who instigated the little trek to Tel Aviv, was incredulous. Who doesn't like the beach?

Me. I hate sun, for starters. And happy, glowing people. And sand. Oh, and water. And wearing a bathing suit. Especially wearing a bathing suit.

"You're going to learn to love the beach," was all my friend said.

One Foot Out The Door

Keeping non-haredim in Israel’s
poorest city is an increasingly difficult task.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

 A September 2009 New York Times travel article (“West Jerusalem Shows its Hip Secular Side”) praised the many “secular” attractions the city has to offer, from trendy new shops and restaurants to cutting-edge architecture.

While Israelis were gratified to read a positive article about their country for a change, portraying Jerusalem as a capital of tourism and not terror, many were amused by the use of “secular” and “Jerusalem” in the same sentence. 

Outside haredi neighborhoods, young Jerusalemites feel comfortable wearing shorts and mini-skirts. Michele Chabin

Summer’s Best

A roundup of some of the top events in the coming season.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/12/2010

 Want to taste some of the world’s best olive oils, sample the best new wines from the Golan or watch the final episode of Israel’s version of “American Idol” live? Those are some of the highlights of this summer’s tourist season in Israel.

In addition, travel agents and hotel concierges will undoubtedly steer tourists towards the country’s “Top 10” attractions.

Inbal Hotel chef Itzik Barak will take part in olive oil competition.

This Factory Sparkles

Touring jewelry and clothing designer
Michal Negrin’s empire in Bat Yam.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/12/2010

 I n 1982, when I was 10 years old, I saw an animateD FILM,
“The Secret of NIMH,” in which a secondary character, a crow named Jeremy, seeks to impress his female counterpart by giving her jewelry. “Gimme the sparkly,” he beseeches of the main character, a mouse named Mrs. Brisby. “I gotta have the sparkly! Girls can’t resist sparklies!”

A necklace Negrin designed for a show in Spain, above. Below, Neshama Shapiro, 8, models a Negrin hair accessory.

Playing It By Ear In Tel Aviv

Sampling the club scene in Israel’s capital of culture.

Israel Correspondent
05/12/2010

 

Tel Aviv — After more than a decade living here,
I’ve long ceased being a tourist in this city. But after nearly five years of fatherhood, I might as well be one as far as Tel Aviv nightlife is concerned.

Bars have opened and bands have matured all just a few steps away from my central Tel Aviv flat. A tiny but fruitful funk scene has sprung up. I hear there’s also an ample selection of indie rock. Meanwhile, I can’t remember the last movie I saw or the last band I saw live in a bar.

Karolina, one of Israel’s most popular young singers, performs at the trendy club Rothschild 12. Joshua Mitnick

Israel Travel: May 2010

History and Beyond: From Masada to the Tel Aviv nightclub scene, from Susya to Michal Negrin’s jewelry empire.

05/12/2010
Israel Travel May 2010
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