Tel Aviv

Sailing Into History

Staff Writer
They finally played “Hatikvah” at the Olympics. Israel, which spent 40 years in the athletic desert, winning no medals from the country’s first appearance in the Summer Games in 1952 until Yael Arad’s silver in judo in 1992, won gold for the first time this week. Windsurfer Gal Friedman, 28, who won a bronze medal in his Mistral sailing event in Atlanta eight years ago, took the gold on Wednesday in Athens, beating a Greek sailor by 11 points.

Where Did You Go, Ari Ben Canaan?

Staff Writer
A public opinion pollster is interviewing people on the street. He stops four people and asks, “Excuse me, what is your opinion of the meat shortage?” 
A Russian says, “What is opinion?”
A Pole says, “What is meat?”
An American says, “What is shortage?”
An Israeli says, “What is ‘excuse me’?”

My first time in Israel  was an education. But not in the way I had anticipated.

Alternative Beit Din Gaining Some Traction

Staff Writer
Jerusalem — Rabbi Yosef Carmel, an Israeli Army veteran and founder of an advanced training center for Israeli rabbis, received an unexpected call from overseas the other day. The call was from an Israeli, a secular businessman whose real estate dealings in Romania with a religious Romanian Jew had become strained. A lawsuit, with 400,000 euros at risk (more than $500,000), was pending. Don’t go to a civil court in Romania, a Bucharest rabbi advised the Israeli — call Rabbi Carmel.

Shavuot, Samaritan-Style

Staff Writer
Five weeks after the Jewish world celebrated the Festival of Weeks, the Samaritans celebrated theirs. On Sunday, Shavuot on the lunar calendar of the Samaritans — descendants of Jewish tribes exiled from the Holy Land nearly three millennia ago — several scores of members of the extant group made their annual pilgrimage to Mount Gerizim, their holy mountain near Nablus in the West Bank.  

Culture Clash Reigns At Parade

Staff Writer
Plans to host a Gay Pride Parade in Jerusalem last year brought protests from Israel’s Orthodox community. The parade was cancelled, a casualty of public concern over the military battles at the country’s northern and southern borders. Last week Tel Aviv’s annual Gay Pride rally took place, and both gay marchers and Orthodox protestors turned out.

Passover, Samaritan Style

Staff Writer
Mount Gerizim, in the northern West Bank halfway between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, holds a special place in Jewish tradition. It was the site where half of the biblical tribes were commanded to pronounce the blessings upon the Children of Israel after Joshua led them into the Promised Land. In Samaritan tradition, Mount Gerizim holds the highest position of honor.

A Forest Of Symbols In Tel Aviv

Staff Writer
Tishrei, the time of tzedakah in Israel, took symbolic form in Tel Aviv this week. During the Ten Days of Repentance, when the crucial role of charity assumes a prominent role in the High Holy Days liturgy, when the yom tov expenses of Jewish households rise dramatically, the Latet organization brought the concept to one of Israel’s central gathering places — through cardboard cutouts. Latet, which feeds the poor, conducted its annual, nationwide fundraising campaign by erecting thousands of white, cardboard images, in human shapes, in Rabin Square.

Barak Dampens Embassy Furor

The legislative storm over the Clinton administration’s defiance of a law requiring that the U.S. embassy be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is intensifying. But there are also indications that lawmakers, responding to Prime Minister Ehud Barak&

Washington Correspondent

Several pieces of legislation are in the hopper and letters criticizing the administration’s position are flying down Pennsylvania Avenue, but lawmakers who threatened to strip away the president’s authority to waive penalties under the original Jerusalem Embassy Act have apparently decided to hold their fire.

Meeting with Jewish members of Congress last week, Barak said a decision to force the embassy move now could have implications for the peace process he is trying to revive.

President Obama.gif

Tel Aviv's 'Denial' Magazine

Staff Writer
Terrorism may have Israelis despondent and extra vigilant, but the debut of Time Out Tel Aviv shows they're not hiding in their homes. The latest incarnation of the magazine well known in New York for its detailed chronicling of nightlife and urban recreation, Time Out Tel Aviv hit the newsstands last week. "In these times we try to keep life as normal as possible and that's what we want to give to our readers," says editor Ronit Heber. "You can call it our own little denial for us and all who read us"

Knocking On The Roof: A Briefing From The IDF On Gaza And Civilians

Thursday, October 1st, 2009

Imagine getting a phone call from an advancing army warning you to get out of the area.


Or getting a “knock on the roof,” in the form of a dummy bomb dropped from a military plane, warning you that the terrorist hiding in your building has been targeted, and the next bomb will be real.


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