Tel Aviv

Finding Eva

12/08/2009
In New York, it was mid-August on a Sunday morning. In Tel Aviv, it was afternoon. I took a deep breath, picked up the phone, and dialed 14 numbers. “Shalom?” said an elderly woman. “Shalom,” I replied. “And hello. I am looking for Eva H___. Are you Eva?” “Yes.” Her voice sounded guarded and cautious: “Who are you?”

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

Long before Starbucks, or even Tel Aviv, cafés played a key role in fostering (and caffeinating) Jewish literary and intellectual communities.

04/03/2009
At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

An Innocent Patient Abroad

Special To The Jewish Week
10/20/2009
Perhaps it was divine retribution for the blatantly treif lunch I’d enjoyed so much at one of Zichron Yaakov’s new boutique eateries earlier that day.

Plane Expensive

08/13/2008
Staff Writer
The long New York-to-Tel Aviv run turned out to be a short run for Israir, the upstart Israeli air carrier. Two years, to be exact. Israir Airlines announced last week that it would suspend its Tel Aviv-New York flights as of Sept. 13 — in the run-up to the high-volume High Holy Day season. The carrier said the route was generating little profit in current economic conditions.

The Next ‘Crocs,’ Direct From Tel Aviv

07/23/2008
Staff Writer
Sick of donning those goofy, “clown shoes with holes” known as Crocs — but can’t resist the obvious comfort factor? Well, there’s a new plastic sandal in town, and it’s direct from Israel. The Hoki sandal, popularized by Tel Aviv-based former executive producer Shlomit Slavin, has hit boutiques on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg and Park Slope, and can be purchased online at Ravinstyle.com.     

Israeli Jewelry Finds Downtown Benchmark

12/26/2007
Staff Writer
Eli Halili gets what he wants. And he has a wooden bench with his name on it to prove it.

Israel Ambassadors In Training

01/31/2003
Staff Writer
Rabbi Joseph Brodie had been planning a family vacation in Ireland for this summer. But while visiting Israel this month with the Jewish Theological Seminary, he decided to switch plans and bring the family to Israel. Rabbi Brodie, vice president of student affairs at the Conservative seminary, escorted 102 students on a four-day mission in which they received Ministry of Tourism training to become "tourism ambassadors."
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