Rockville

Hitting The Charity Snack-Pot

Staff Writer
09/21/2009 - 20:00
For a mitzvah project leading up to her bat mitzvah three years ago at Temple B’nai Sholom in Rockville Centre, L.I., Jenna Talesnick crocheted baby blankets for those in need. She liked helping others so much that it has now become a big part of her life. In her search for other projects, Talesnick learned of the Snack Wrap Program run by Rock and Wrap it Up!, a national, independent anti-poverty think tank based in Cedarhurst, L.I.

Opening New Chapters

02/06/2003 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Thanks to Rena Cohen, some third-grade students in Beit Shemesh are reading "The Cat in the Hat." Beit Shemesh is an Israeli city whose public schools, like those throughout the country, were informed recently that the government, because of security expenses, had no budget for English-language books. Cohen is a biotechnology administrator and Jewish activist who lives in the Washington suburbs, and was upset that Israeli children wouldn't learn English.

Hitting The Charity Snack-Pot

10/15/2009 - 20:00
by Stewart Ain Staff Writer For a mitzvah project leading up to her bat mitzvah three years ago at Temple B’nai Sholom in Rockville Centre, L.I., Jenna Talesnick crocheted baby blankets for those in need. She liked helping others so much that it has now become a big part of her life. In her search for other projects, Talesnick learned of the Snack Wrap Program run by Rock and Wrap it Up!, a national, independent anti-poverty think tank based in Cedarhurst, L.I.

UJA-Fed.'s 'Open Door'

03/16/2000 - 19:00
Staff Writer
When Danielle Zeiler began seriously dating her husband-to-be, Scott Greenwood, she made it clear that if they married, their children would be raised Jews. "He said fine, but then when we became engaged, he said he wanted his religion represented in the marriage also," recalled the 26-year-old. "I said we had a problem." Another problem surfaced over the question of who would officiate at the marriage.

'Undoing Damage' Of Welfare Reform

12/18/1997 - 19:00
Staff Writer
Saying the last 18 months have been one of the "saddest chapters in our country's history," the executive vice president of UJA-Federation detailed his organization's struggle to deal with the impact of welfare reform. "I can report to you the panic that ensued" as legal immigrants here more than five years realized they would lose Supplemental Security Income, Medicaid and food stamps, Stephen Solender told a recent UJA-Federation-sponsored legislative breakfast.
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