Riga

Yom HaShoah 2010: The Cello, The Dress And The Autograph Book

Three new books explore the Holocaust through the prism of everyday objects

Jewish Week Book Critic
04/15/2010

Mundane objects can be the containers of powerful stories. Those objects take on a degree of holiness when they are infused with memory and loss, and are the only tangible connection to lives and times that are no more.

Three new books related to the dark history of the Holocaust, are connected to objects that have become priceless and symbolic: a cello, a child’s dress and an autograph book.

Time was out of the hands of labor camp inmates, but celloist Lev Aronson kept a life-saving beat in his head.

‘He Wasn’t Afraid Of Anything’

03/09/2007
Staff Writer
Leonid Bereslavskiy asks every day, “Where’s Papa?” Yulia Bereslavskiy gets “kind of jealous when I see other kids talking with their fathers.”Riva Bereslavskiy, their grandmother, just cries.Leonid, 5, and Yulia, 9, are brother and sister.

Thumping His Chess

09/17/1999
Staff Writer
The Schneider family of Hastings-on-Hudson in Westchester is running out of shelf space. The bookcase in their living room is packed with the chess books, in Russian, that Dimitri brought from his native Riga, and the ones in English he bought after the family immigrated to the United States eight years ago.There are the chess sets that Dimitri likes to buy. And the trophies he keeps winning.Dimitri, 14, is the top-ranked player in the country in the U.S.

Giving Back, Close To Home

07/15/2009
Staff Writer
Tamara Slobodskaya, a new resident of Canarsie, by way of Latvia, had a short walk to her first Passover seder. The holiday meal, a communal event sponsored by the Jewish Community Council of Canarsie, took place in the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty’s Council Towers, a subsidized apartment building where she and her husband Boris moved a decade ago.

Bringing Justice To War Criminals

12/08/2006
Staff Writer
In the 1970s, Elliot Welles, a Holocaust survivor who had become a successful restaurant owner in Manhattan, scheduled an appointment with two executives of the Anti-Defamation League. He wanted to propose that the ADL establish a unit to hunt down fugitive Nazis.

The Forgotten Olympians

08/06/2004
Staff Writer
In Olympic years, some People of the Book become people of the backstroke, the clean-and-jerk, and the high hurdles. The Games, Summer and Winter, serve as a showcase for the best athletes, Jewish and non-Jewish. From A (Ruth Abeles) to Z (Eli Zuckerman), names like Mark Spitz and Kerry Strug are in the record books as well as Jewish history texts. Beginning with 10 medals won by Jewish athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896, Jews have been a steady presence at the international competition.

Thumping His Chess

09/16/1999
Staff Writer
The Schneider family of Hastings-on-Hudson in Westchester is running out of shelf space. The bookcase in their living room is packed with the chess books, in Russian, that Dimitri brought from his native Riga, and the ones in English he bought after the family immigrated to the United States eight years ago. There are the chess sets that Dimitri likes to buy. And the trophies he keeps winning.
Syndicate content