Ramallah

In Limbo On The West Bank

05/01/1998
Israel Correspondent

Ramallah, West Bank — Walking through the sunny, well-kept streets of Deir Debwan, a half-hour outside Jerusalem, it is easy to see why this tony Arab enclave has been dubbed the Beverly Hills of the West Bank.

Thanks to the success of its far-flung sons and daughters, multi-level homes abound. Some have indoor swimming pools. And at one time or another, nearly half the town’s 8,000 residents have lived in the United States.

A House Divided, A House United

06/21/1999
Israel Correspondent

Ramle — The industrial zone of this working-class Jewish-Arab city between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv is home to numerous car-repair shops, gas stations and factories. The streets are lined with broken glass and litter, the sidewalks with fancy cars awaiting a muffler or tune-up.

Shapiro Honor Sparks Flap

05/09/2003
Staff Writer
Jews For Racial and Economic Justice, the New York City social action group, had planned to hold its annual awards dinner, as usual, at the Upper West Side Congregation B'nai Jeshurun. After all, the dovish group's major award is named for the progressive synagogue's beloved late Rabbi Marshall Meyer. And its current rabbi, Rolando Matalon, is on the JFREJ board of directors.

Giving Back

09/10/2008
Special to the Jewish Week
Hers was a busy home while Hadassah Freilich was growing up in Gardener, Mass. With her father the rabbi of an Orthodox synagogue and her mother busy in the community, young Hadassah grew up with a sure sense that Jews took care of others. That if someone was hungry, you fed him.

Talking With 'The Enemy'

05/10/2002
Staff Writer
After listening to news accounts of Palestinian homicide bombers and Israel's military response, Eddy Ehrlich feels ready "to explode." Then Ehrlich, a self-described political centrist, goes to his monthly Jewish-Arab dialogue circle and comes away feeling like a changed man. "Thirty souls have opened up and the humanity flows," Ehrlich says. "I go out so relieved."

What Will The World Say? Don’t Ask

04/12/2002
Associate Editor

It’s all up in flames—-our reconciliation with the world, with the church, with the Palestinians. Yossi Klein Halevi writes in The Los Angeles Times (April 8) that all the dialogue and advancements are “threatened by a one-sided Christian approach to the Middle East conflict.” Despite the “outrageous invasion of the Church of the Nativity by several hundred Palestinian gunmen and wanted terrorists...

Mourning A Lost Son Of Israel

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
This past week, while Israel prayed for a kidnapped Israeli corporal and Israeli soldiers struck at Gaza, a future Israeli soldier was buried in Jerusalem.

Abduction As A Weapon

06/30/2006
Staff Writer
As far back as the Munich Olympics of 1972, Palestinian terrorists and their supporters have used kidnapping as a political tool, abducting Israeli civilians and soldiers to be used in potential prisoner swaps and to obtain other concessions from Israel. Following is a chronology of prominent Israeli kidnappings and MIA cases: 1972: Members of the Black September terrorist group sneak into the Olympic Village in Munich and take 11 members of the Israeli delegation hostage. All 11 are killed.

A Road That Divides A Nation

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
In most countries, a new highway is just a stretch of asphalt. In Israel, a new highway is a source of national debate. Israel is building a unique four-lane highway through the West Bank, east of Jerusalem — two lanes are for Israelis, two for Palestinians. Separated by a tall wall of concrete that looks like Jerusalem stone, the nearly completed road will keep the nationalities separate from each other, allowing Palestinians to travel through Israeli-held land with few exits along the way.
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