Pittsburgh

The Many Kinds Of Intermarriage

 The last Super Bowl I watched was in 1980, when I was in third grade. I know the Steelers won, but that’s about all I can tell you.

The Latkes That Bind

12/16/2005
Special To The Jewish Week
When I was a small child in Houston, my mother would come to school every year to teach about Chanukah. Armed with her guitar, wax-encrusted menorah, dreidels and box of latkes mix, my mother (laying her New York accent on a little thicker than usual) gave my Christian classmates a brief recap of the Maccabee story before launching into some songs. A blonde girl once requested "Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer." The teacher looked embarrassed, but my mother laughed and said, "Why not?"

Second ‘Exodus’ For Survivor

07/25/2008
Staff Writer
Frances Kanenbrand first decided to make aliyah as a child in Sierpe, the Polish town where she was raised in a Zionist family. This week she finally became an olah chadasha, a new immigrant in Israel, eight decades after she started dreaming about life in the Promised Land, 61 years after she almost made the trip on the Exodus. In July 1947 she was among 4,515 passengers — mostly Holocaust survivors, as she was — on the converted steamer officially known as Exodus 1947.

New Principles Rankle Reform Rank And File

06/18/1999
Staff Writer
When Fan Wiener read in her local daily newspaper that the nation's Reform rabbis had voted to push for more Jewish tradition (including eating kosher) the 79-year-old Dallas grandmother thought of bolting Reform Judaism. "She called me and threatened to quit the two major Reform temples she belongs to," says her son Thomas, a Philadelphia attorney. "She said she didn't intend to become a Conservative or Orthodox Jew."

Reform Backlash Over ‘Ten Principles’

12/04/1998
Staff Writer
The Reform movement is embroiled in an emotional national debate on the future of its belief system. At issue is a controversial draft document titled the “Ten Principles of Reform Judaism” that seeks to set guidelines for how North America’s 1.2 million Reform Jews should practice their faith in the 21st century. Rather than fostering unity, the platform, authored by the leader of the movement’s rabbinic arm, has provoked a firestorm of criticism from Reform lay leaders, academics and rabbis nationwide.

Reform Rabbis Embrace Ritual — Carefully

05/28/1999
Staff Writer
After months of intense debate, Reform Judaism this week charted a cautious new course into the next century by approving a moderate platform designed to keep the peace among its traditional and classical wings.

Facing Up To The Hurt

05/19/2000
Staff Writer
Regina Benshimon was busy preparing for Yom Kippur last September, but she stopped as the sun set the evening before the Day of Atonement would begin to celebrate the Sabbath. After dinner with her husband and the five of her seven children who lived at home (the two eldest were already married) she went to bed early. It was to be the 44-year-old chasidic woman's last Shabbat.

Second ‘Exodus’ For Survivor

07/23/2008
Staff Writer
Frances Kanenbrand first decided to make aliyah as a child in Sierpe, the Polish town where she was raised in a Zionist family. This week she finally became an olah chadasha, a new immigrant in Israel, eight decades after she started dreaming about life in the Promised Land, 61 years after she almost made the trip on the Exodus. In July 1947 she was among 4,515 passengers — mostly Holocaust survivors, as she was — on the converted steamer officially known as Exodus 1947.

Is Hall Of Fame In The Cards?

07/07/2006
Staff Writer
A century after he was a standout major league baseball catcher, Johnny Kling has been bypassed by the national pastime. When the Veterans Committee of baseball’s Hall of Fame made its last choices for long-retired players, in 2001, Kling did not make the cut. When Jewish Major Leaguers issued its initial set of Jewish baseball cards in 2003, and an updated version earlier this year, Kling wasn’t there. Was it because Kling, who died at 71 in 1947, was too Jewish, or not Jewish enough? Gil Bogen says it’s both.
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