Philadelphia

Nevison: I Did Nothing Wrong

06/16/2006
Staff Writer
After pleading guilty this week to five counts of sexually abusing his young nephew over a four-year period, Cantor Howard Nevison continues to maintain that he did nothing wrong. In an exclusive interview with The Jewish Week Tuesday (the first time he has spoken publicly about the case that made sensational headlines in 2002) Cantor Nevison said that his deal with prosecutors was akin to a "no contest" plea: "when you don't admit to anything."

NJPS Credibility Questioned

11/22/2002
Staff Writer
Leading demographers are raising serious doubts about the credibility of the long-awaited $6 million National Jewish Population Study 2000, now that its sponsor has shelved the findings pending an investigation into the loss of some research data.

Emanu-El Criticized Over Cantor Case

03/01/2002
Staff Writers
Experts in sexual ethics violations among clergy are criticizing Temple Emanu-El for the way it has handled the arrest of its cantor, Howard Nevison, on charges that he sexually abused his young nephew. “It’s a huge mistake that they kept him on” after Nevison brought the issue to the attention of synagogue leaders, said Dr. Samuel Klagsbrun, director of the pastoral psychiatry program at the Jewish Theological Seminary, which ordains rabbis and cantors.

What’s In A Name? Millions Of Dollars

03/19/2008
Staff Writer
Editor’s Note: This is the second of two articles on controversies involving naming gifts in philanthropy. Last September, a Jewish day school known since its 1946 founding as Akiba Hebrew Academy changed its name to the Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy, after the deceased brother of a major donor, in exchange for a $5 million pledge.

In White Mountains, Miles To Go Before We Meet

04/14/2009
Staff Writer
North Conway, N.H. — Karen Eisenberg brought the homemade chopped liver. Joan Kurz brought a bagful of bottled gefilte fish. Suzie Laskin, the charoset. And other women came to Maestro’s Italian restaurant last week, carrying yom tov staples, as the sun set over the White Mountains. It was time for the second-night seder of Chavurah HeHarim, the Jewish community of rural east-central New Hampshire and western Maine, and the restaurant staff had prepared a meal of roast chicken, tsimmes and chametz-free chocolate cake.

Go, Yankees!

Monday, November 2nd, 2009

If mankind is truly made in the image of God, I like to think that the Creator enjoys some of the same pleasures we do.

 

Maybe that’s why He arranged for a World Series this year uninterrupted by Shabbat or Yom Tovim, which is not always a given.

 

I’ll leave it up to wiser minds than mine to explore the history of Jews and baseball or delve into the more spiritual meanings of the Yankees’ return to the Fall Classic after a long drought and their being on the verge of championship number 27.

Holy Toledo!

12/17/2008
Staff Writer
Philadelphia — Aviva Koloski, a junior at Stern Hebrew High School here, plays on her Modern Orthodox day school’s girls’ basketball team, but she never considered playing basketball in college. Because of various halachic restrictions, “I never would have thought it was possible for an Orthodox Jewish girl to play basketball” at the collegiate level, she said. Today, Koloski is giving the matter another thought.

Saving Cemeteries Here And Abroad

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
Jack Goldfarb's first memories of Staszow were second-hand. As a child in Philadelphia, the son of immigrants, he heard his parents' stories, in Yiddish, about landsmen in Staszow. He heard about heroic relatives in that market town in south-central Poland who defied the Nazis during World War II and paid with their lives. He heard about the postcards with news of the mishpocha crammed in tiny Yiddish letters that would arrive several times a year, until the war started.

Begging For Forgiveness

09/22/2006
Staff Writer
A man who likes extinct languages, Mel Gibson had a chance to practice his Latin this summer — he made several mea culpas.   Following his drunken, sexist, profane, anti-Semitic tirade in Malibu in July, the actor-director apologized to the police officers who arrested him. He apologized in a general public statement for saying “despicable” things. He apologized “specifically to everyone in the Jewish community,” to “those who have been hurt and offended by those words.”  
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