Philadelphia

New Battle Brewing Over Sudan Boycott

02/23/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

An otherwise noncontentious national meeting of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs next week could see a fierce debate and politicking over a proposal to put the umbrella Jewish group in line behind efforts to impose divestment on Sudan because of the genocide in Darfur.

Mulling Divestment, From The Sudan

02/23/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

The Jewish community appears poised to join a growing movement of city and state legislatures, universities, religious organizations and other groups in calling for a targeted economic boycott of the Sudan.

The move, supporting divestment from companies with business ties to the Sudanese government, would come as the ethnic cleansing in Darfur, a region of the Sudan, enters its fourth year. The slaughter, considered a genocide by the U.S. government and much of the international community, has killed at least 400,000 civilians and displaced as many as 2.5 million.

Phylactery Phobia

Plane grounded after flight crew
mistakes davening teen for a terrorist.

01/28/2010
Philadelphia Exponent

Philadelphia — If there’s any upshot to the misunderstanding that grounded a small aircraft last week in Philadelphia — and scared the wits out of two Jewish teenagers — it’s that the general public might now know a bit more about tefillin.

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Day Schools Try New Ideas

At New Jersey conference — the first collaboration by all the movements —
educators seek ways to lower costs, engage families.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

Teaneck, N.J. — A little-known foundation based in the Philadelphia suburbs is piloting an adult Jewish education program for parents of local day school students, one that aims to increase parental buy-in for the day school system while also easing some of the tuition burden.
The Kohelet Fellowship is providing a tuition credit of $1,000 for individual parents and $1,500 for couples at four Jewish day schools in the Delaware Valley in return for participation in 16 weekly phone sessions with a Partners-in-Torah mentor over the course of the school year.

Heads of the four partnership organizations for the North American Jewish Day School Conference, from left: Scott Goldberg, dire

A Community Raw And Unformed

Wednesday, June 18th, 2008 There will be hundreds of articles still to be published in Jewish newspapers and magazines in the next six months, but I have already identified one that is surely to be one of the most ridiculous of 2008. The new issue of the very glossy “Jewish Living (June/July) has a big cover story, “Where We Live Now: Top Ten Neighborhoods” in North America to “raise a family, get involved, meet a mate, score a great nosh.”

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

Overcoming Fear Of Mice

07/23/2008
Staff Writer
Bent over a doubly magnified computer screen, 82-year-old Arnold clenched his mouse and clicked “OK” after typing his phone number into the AutoCorrect feature of his Microsoft Word document. He returned to the blank white screen and entered a prescribed command in Times New Roman, size 18 font, and defiantly pressed “Enter.” “Magic!” Arnold exclaimed, his mouth agape and jaw dropping rapidly, as he watched the digits of his phone number instantly fly onto the screen.

The Kosher Rachael Ray

03/19/2008
Staff Writer
When Jamie Mendelovici Geller was in the fourth grade, her mom, Goldie, contemplated building a new family home in Philadelphia — one without a kitchen. Goldie came to her senses and instead instructed the architect to place the kitchen off to the side of the house, near the garage, so she would never have to walk through the kitchen if she didn’t have to.   

A New Context For Yiddish

07/19/2002
Staff Writer
Yiddish is the "mama loshen" to most Jews, the "mother tongue" spoken by generations of parents and grandparents. To David Roskies, Yiddish is also the language of his schooldays: the "lehrer loshen," or teacher language.   
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