Paris

'Now I Am A Ghost'

11/24/2006
Staff Writer

Ten months after her son was kidnapped and tortured to death by young Muslim gang members in Paris (after her son became a symbol of anti-Semitic violence, and she began making public speeches about the type of hatred that took her son's life) Ruth Halimi brought her message of tolerance to New York City. "Ilan's tragedy was a humanitarian tragedy," not just a Jewish tragedy, Ruth Halimi told a lunch reception last week at the Anti-Defamation League headquarters in Midtown, her first appearance here.

The Stubble Of Remembrance

08/04/2006
Staff Writer
I hadn’t seen Nissim, owner of my favorite kosher restaurant in my Queens neighborhood, for a while, but he saw something new on me right away. “That’s one of those Three Weeks things, right?” he said, pointing to my face with a note of concern. It had sprouted a growth of unkempt, untrimmed beard since I last had sampled his steamed dumplings and egg roll.

The Chance To Fight Back

04/09/2004
Staff Writer
Military service is in the Perl family’s blood. Pvt. Otto Perl spent nearly a year in the Austrian army from 1937 to 1938. His father had been an officer in that same army in World War I, and two of his uncles had served in WWI. Perl, a tailor, was 22 in early 1938 when he was discharged a few months before his homeland was annexed by Nazi Germany. A Jew, he was arrested and sent to the Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps for a year. He survived the forced labor and beatings and frigid weather.

The Forgotten Olympians

08/06/2004
Staff Writer
In Olympic years, some People of the Book become people of the backstroke, the clean-and-jerk, and the high hurdles. The Games, Summer and Winter, serve as a showcase for the best athletes, Jewish and non-Jewish. From A (Ruth Abeles) to Z (Eli Zuckerman), names like Mark Spitz and Kerry Strug are in the record books as well as Jewish history texts. Beginning with 10 medals won by Jewish athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896, Jews have been a steady presence at the international competition.

France Remembers Deportation

07/27/2007
Staff Writer
Sixty-five years ago, France tried to show its loyalty to the Nazis. Last week, France showed its loyalty to history.On the anniversary of the July 1942 deportation of some 13,000 Jews by Vichy police from a bicycle stadium that served as a transit camp, French officials took part in a series of memorial events.

New Suit To Pressure Poles On Property

01/21/2005
Staff Writer
In a test case that will likely increase international pressure on Poland to return billions of dollars of property seized from Jews by the Nazis during World War II and nationalized by the communists after the war, a Polish-born Holocaust survivor is expected to file suit before the European Court of Human Rights in the next few weeks, The Jewish Week has learned. A New York-based not-for-profit law firm is preparing the case on behalf of Henryk Pikielny, who now lives in Paris.

Stage Set For WJC Showdown

01/07/2005
Editor and Publisher
On the eve of the first World Jewish Congress Assembly in three years, the group’s chief spokesman said he welcomes the prospect of an investigation by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer’s office into its financial dealings but regrets the failure to resolve internally a conflict over past governance.The WJC Assembly will meet in Brussels for three days starting Sunday, with an expected 500 participants representing 88 Jewish communities from around the world.

A Worldwide Plague

10/27/2000
Staff Writer
Yehudit Moch of Park Slope walked into St. Vincent's Hospital in Greenwich Village last week sporting a T-shirt embroidered with a large Star of David. "You'd better close your jacket," said the receptionist, who was half-Jewish. "It's not safe to be wearing that on the streets of New York."
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