Paris

Table For One

Years ago - and I'm not kidding when I say years ago - there was this movie playing in the theaters called, "Nobody Loves Me."  I was living in New York at the time and went with a girlfriend to see it.

"One for Nobody Loves Me," I said in full volume to the ticket lady. You can imagine the jokes that ensued.

But I am reminded of it every evening when I cook dinner. Because there is nothing sadder than eating alone.

Building Bridges

03/11/2005
Staff Writer

When Pizmon, Columbia’s famed Jewish a cappella group, began to croon a series of Hebrew melodies, a group of about 100 French university students — visibly tired from their trans-Atlantic flight earlier in the day — roused and began clapping to the music, cheering, dancing and snapping photos of the singers.After each song, Pizmon received a standing ovation from the French student leaders who gathered Sunday in the basement of the Kraft Center, the home of Columbia University’s Hillel.“It was something very unexpected for us,” said Jimmy Pinto, a senior

Reaching Out In Battle Against Hate

12/24/2004
Staff Writer

In the highly charged political and religious climate of France, the country’s influential Jewish student union has been on the front lines of the fight to beat back hate.It made world headlines this year when it launched its controversial, and since pulled, advertising campaign with the words “Dirty Jew” scrawled in graffiti-like script over the images of Jesus and Mary.

Great Shopping (And History, Too)

12/05/2007
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Residents of Mamilla, a century-old neighborhood located right outside the Old City of Jerusalem, have been eyewitnesses to many important events in the city’s turbulent history.

In 1948 and 1967, they either fled or shuttered themselves in their homes as soldiers fought on their doorsteps. Now, during happier times, they watch tens of thousands of Israelis march to the Western Wall to celebrate holidays.

A Tale Of Two Egos

02/21/2003
Special to The Jewish Week

At the height of their contest for Cezanne's mantle as the leader of the French avant-garde, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso agreed to swap pictures. Over the previous two years, Paris' leading provocateur Matisse had steadily ceded ground to the newcomer Picasso, until the fall of 1907, when the two men were deadlocked.

Polanski Gets Personal

12/13/2002
Staff Writer

Roman Polanski's latest feature film is a dramatic account of one man's survival in wartime Warsaw. "The Pianist," which opens Dec. 27, is also a documentary in at least one respect: its star, Adrien Brody, nearly starved himself to portray the Jewish musician and composer Wladyslaw Szpilman, shedding some 30 pounds from his already slender frame as filming progressed.

A Tale Of Two Fictions

08/23/2002
Special To The Jewish Week

Israelis live a bifurcated existence. On the one hand they wearily read the morning paper, always knowing someone who is affected by a bomb, or the closing of businesses caused by the bomb. On the other hand, they go to bed dreaming of childhoods in Toronto or Paris or Arad, worrying about unfinished paintings, or remembering a first kiss behind the chicken coop near the abandoned kibbutz.

Melodies Of Awe

09/08/2004
Special To The Jewish Week

Perhaps because it is the liturgical music with which I am most familiar, perhaps the emotions of the occasion are always so heightened. But for whatever reason, I believe there is no music in the Jewish tradition more powerful than the various versions of the High Holy Days service, whatever its provenance. Composers as various as Ernest Bloch and Max Bruch have been drawn to this music and for a cantor it is undoubtedly the crown of the year. Below are six new recordings that speak directly to tradition and a seventh which comments on it obliquely but passionately.

‘Do I Have To Belong Somewhere?’

01/23/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Billy Wilder used to joke about his former compatriots in Austria. He would say, “The Austrians are a marvelous people: they have convinced the whole world that Beethoven was Austrian and Hitler was German.” Axel Corti, a Paris-born, half-Italian, half-Austrian filmmaker, would have undoubtedly appreciated this jibe. Corti, who died of leukemia in 1993, spent his entire career as a film, theater and radio director putting the Austrian-Jewish connection under the microscope of his art with scathing results.

No Two Documentaries Are Alike

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

The second week of the New York Jewish Film Festival is heavily weighted towards documentaries, but these days that label covers such a huge swatch of territory that you can’t know what to expect. The movies included in this year’s event are no exception to the trend toward the unconventional in nonfiction cinema.

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