Paris

Jewish-Muslim Friendship Bus: Preaching Coexistence In France

06/29/2010

Another summer, another chance to take Jewish-Islamic dialogue on the road in France.

This time, the road is Route E 54, headed southeast from Paris toward Besancon.

A unique experiment in interfaith dialogue recently pulled into the city in eastern France with its message of trust and tolerance.

The Jewish-Muslim Friendship Bus, a five-year-old project of a French Jewish-Muslim Friendship group known as AJMF, travels the country each summer, preaching coexistence to members of the religious communities that have been riven by violence and hatred in recent years.

Photo By Sue Fishkoff/JTA

In Jerusalem, Making Hugs, Not War

06/24/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — It was 102 degrees here earlier this week, but that didn’t deter a few hundred Israelis, Palestinians and others from gathering outside the Old City of Jerusalem for The Jerusalem Hug, an annual event designed to open hearts and heal the world.

Something Old, Something New

Algerian Jewish wedding traditions inspired a one-of-a-kind dress.

06/16/2010

 I had never envisioned my own wedding until I met my husband Isaac four years ago. We wanted to create a wedding that would reflect both Jewish traditions as well as our own personalities. The summer before our wedding we spent three months in France, studying the colonial archives. At the time I was just beginning my dissertation about Jews during the Algerian War for decolonization (1954–1962).

 Norma DiSciullo

‘I Never Felt In My Place’

In ‘Let It Rain,’ filmmaker/actress Agnes Jaoui, the French-born daughter of Tunisian Jewish
immigrants, explores damaged people.

06/15/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Agnes Jaoui knows what it feels like not to fit in.

“My parents were Jews from Tunisia,” she says, sitting on the edge of the bed in a Soho hotel suite. “I was born in a suburb of Paris, but when I was 7 we moved to Paris itself. We lived in a poor and ugly block, but in a very chic arondissement [neighborhood]. So I went to very, very good schools, but it was purely by chance, because we were in this arondissement. I never felt in my place, nowhere.”

Agnes Jaoui as Agathe Villanova and Jean-Pierre Bacri in Jaoui’s “Let it Rain.”

‘Beautiful Words Written Beautifully’

Irene Hizme, an Auschwitz survivor who suffers from multiple sclerosis crafts, hand-lettered cards
to benefit aging Holocaust victims.

06/15/2010
Staff Writer

In the basement of her Oceanside, L.I., home, next to a window and a hand-lettered “Patience” poster, Irene Hizme sits at a drawing board, creating works of intricate calligraphy and flower-filled branches.

A Czechoslovakia-born Holocaust survivor in her “early 70s” and retired biochemist/computer programmer, she spends much of her free time these days making thank-you notes and birthday cards. She does many of her works as a volunteer for The Blue Card, an organization that offers financial assistance to aging Holocaust survivors.

“I’ve had a good life,” says Irene Hizme, who survived the Holocaust and now copes with multiple sclerosis.

Your Best Friend's Yahrtzeit

On the rebbe's 16th yahrtzeit, a memory from Chief Rabbi Lau; a story about the rebbe and Viktor Frankl; and considering some of the recent speculation about the rebbe's Parisian days, here's David Bezborodko's memories of the rebbe in Paris.

And a story passed along from the Avner Institute:

Happy 875th, Maimonides!

Eight hundred and seventy-five years ago, Maimonides was born.  I didn't realize that till yesterday, when I was doing a bit of research on the man, and came across a wonderful summation of his life and contentested legacy.  It's a piece by Arthur Hertzberg, another titan of Jewish learning, who attended an academic conference in Paris for Maimonides' birthday, back in 1985.  Though the conference happened a quarter century ago, Hertzberg's observations are eerily pre

Israel’s Delegitimizers Are Gaining

Flotilla fiasco underscores Jewish state’s vulnerability; think tank urges dramatic change in diplomacy.

06/02/2010
Editor And Publisher

This week brought another political and diplomatic disaster for Israel — further proof that Jerusalem must change dramatically its hasbara efforts, not just to persevere but perhaps even to survive.

Gary Rosenblatt

Giving The Rebbe A Biography

‘The Life and Afterlife of Menachem Mendel Schneerson’
humanizes the Lubavitcher Rebbe, but is its premise flawed?

05/11/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

‘The Rebbe: The Life and Afterlife of Menachem Mendel Schneerson” by Samuel Heilman and Menachem Friedman (Princeton University Press) fills a considerable void in the biography of one of the towering religious figures of the 20th century. But on reading it, one wonders whether the object of the biography is the same Lubavitcher Rebbe the world came to know and admire for pioneering Jewish outreach in the modern age and for being arguably the figure most responsible for the global resurgence in Jewish affiliation.

The authors of a biography of late leader of the Lubavitch movement make no effort to explain his scholarly works.

First Person: Kaddish For Leo Chester

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

My father died 10 years ago and my mother almost 15 years ago, but I now find my self back in shul every morning saying Kaddish, this time for a friend. It is a sad duty to perform and a hard one. I’m not a morning person; getting out of bed and rushing off to shul is a struggle. But, as I did for each of my parents for 11 months, I am now doing for Leo Chester for a month.

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