New York City

The ‘Genius’ Of Poetry

10/18/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Poet, translator and publisher Peter Cole is among this year’s recipients of MacArthur Foundation fellowships, or genius awards, as they are popularly known. The no-strings-attached award, honoring creativity, includes a $500,000 stipend that is paid over five years.

Shirtwaist Fire Revisited

08/03/2006

Nobody shops for shirtwaists anymore. Even those who favor women’s tailored blouses are unlikely to know their traditional name. The word shirtwaist still recalls the worst factory fire in the history of New York City, on March 11, 1911, at the Triangle Waist Factory, also known as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. That day, at least 146 workers died, most of them immigrant Jewish women, many jumping through the blazing windows to their deaths. The building, at the corner of Washington and Greene Streets in Greenwich Village, still stands.

Fit And Frum

07/14/2006
Staff Writer
For a yeshiva graduate from Brooklyn, a mile swim, a 24-mile bike ride and a six-mile run — all in one day — began with a single question. Last year, after David Shaoul had run a 10-kilometer race in Central Park and the New York City Marathon, both on a co-worker’s challenge after a decade-plus of athletic inactivity, he asked himself, “What’s the next thing?” His answer was the triathlon, an Olympic-sanctioned sport that combines long-distance swimming, biking and running, all done consecutively.

Feds, City Address Security Concerns

12/17/2004
Special to The Jewish Week

 Responding to longstanding complaints by the Russian-speaking community of unsafe conditions, Rep.

Capturing The Immigrant’s Loneliness

02/16/2007
Special to The Jewish Week

Sophia Romma, a talented Russian Jewish poet, playwright and academic, divides her time between New York and Moscow and has been critically acclaimed in both world capitals.

The Coolest Tourism

Special To The Jewish Week
03/20/2009

They may not have the historical significance of Masada or the religious meaning of the Western Wall, but for pure refreshment it’s hard to beat Israel’s several water parks.

Those who escape steamy New York City for the cooler temperatures upstate each summer can well understand the need for relief from an Israeli summer heat wave. In Tel Aviv, summer temperatures can reach up to 108 degrees, with 95 percent humidity.

The Global Village in a World of Terror

12/07/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

Last Wednesday, as Americans were easing into the familiar and welcome patterns of a laid-back Thanksgiving weekend, Mumbai was convulsing in a horrific spasm of violence all too familiar to us here in New York.  Images of senseless carnage were all over the print and electronic media, a much beloved rabbi and his wife were among the intentional casualties, and it was woefully easy to relapse into that sense of vulnerability yet again…

Repeal The Blaine Amendment

Special To The Jewish Week
01/16/2009
Repealing or ignoring the last remaining vestige of bigotry contained in the New York State Constitution, the so-called “Blaine” amendment, could open the door to providing parents with children attending religious schools — Jewish, Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Greek Orthodox — with the same approximate $8,500 annually per pupil that charter schools receive, all deducted from the budget of the local school district that the charter school pupils would otherwise attend.

At Bronx Science, A Different Kind Of Lab

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
The entryway of The Bronx High School of Science is dominated by an enormous, tiled mural depicting scientists and their empirical discoveries, along with a quotation by the famous philosopher and education reformer John Dewey: “Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination.” But in the case of the only Holocaust museum located within a New York City public school, imagination accounts for more than just scientific advancement.
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