New York City

They’ll Always Have Palau

12/31/2004
Staff Writer

When Avram Sand tells people where he’s going for winter break, the most common response he gets is “Where?” “Then they ask, ‘why?’ ” said Sand, a senior at Yeshiva University High School in New York City.On Jan. 9, to show hakarat hatov, or appreciation and recognition, for the country’s support of Israel, Sand and nine of his classmates will travel to the Republic of Palau. The island group is home to about 20,000 people and some of the world’s most precious coral reefs.

At Last, A Final Chapter For Milton Steinberg

Sixty years after the rabbi’s death, a novel thought to be ‘too hot to handle’ for its tale
of the Prophet Hosea and his prostitute wife, is published.

03/18/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 

 
When Rabbi Milton Steinberg died suddenly and tragically in 1950 at the age of 46, there was a keen awareness that the Jewish community had lost one of its great literary, intellectual and spiritual voices. Steinberg was a preacher of uncommon eloquence and depth, a literary craftsman of prodigious output, and a scholar at home with both rabbinic and classic literature.
 

Rabbi Steinberg at work. Rabbi Elliott Cosgrove offers a reader’s guide to “The Prophet’s Wife”.

The New Look Of Hebrew Instruction

07/08/2005
Staff Writer

Miriam Harary used to scour New York City bookstores in search of Hebrew textbooks for her students at Hillel High School in Ocean, N.J.Until recently, Hebrew language instruction at Hillel, like dozens of other Jewish day schools, depended largely on the initiative of individual teachers. Yet even the most ambitious instructors often were discouraged by the lack of formal curricula and age-appropriate materials for teaching modern Hebrew to teens.

On Course In Battling Prejudice

11/05/2004
Staff Writer

‘People from the projects, they don’t read.”

That’s how Kelly Connerton, a teacher at the new Peace and Diversity Academy in the Bronx, summed up her ninth-grade students’ disconnect with literacy.
“They don’t see their cultures represented in the Euro-centric literature they’ve been taught,” said Connerton, who teaches English at the academy, a first-of-its-kind partnership between the New York City Public Schools and the Anti-Defamation League.

Stanton Street Back To Life

09/17/2004
Staff Writer

Elissa Sampson and her husband, Jonathan Boyarin, longtime members of the Stanton Street Shul, held a blue paper napkin between them as they twirled to the music of the four-piece klezmer band hired by the synagogue for the afternoon.

Is Facebook Chametz?

Crossposted to Blog.RabbiJason

Is Facebook kosher? If so, is it kosher for Passover? I'm not posing the question of whether it is acceptable to log on to Facebook on the first and last days of Passover, when observant Jews refrain from using computers or the Web.  Rather, is Facebook activity allowed at all during the Jewish Spring festival?

 Rabbi Shir Yaakov Feinstein-Feit

Vallone Braves Hebron

04/24/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — While British Prime Minister Tony Blair practically did cartwheels to avoid courting controversy during his visit to Israel this week, New York City Council Speaker Peter Vallone, also on a whirlwind tour, took no such precautions.

Art After The Crime

09/21/2001
Staff Writer

In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.

'To Paint History'

11/07/2003
Staff Writer

When history touched Yonia Fain's life, it hit with gale force. For 30 years he was "dragged by the storm of events over half a world," the Brooklyn-based painter and Yiddish poet once wrote.

Between 1923 - when a 9-year-old Fain and his family fled Bolshevik Russia, and 1953 - when he settled in New York City - Fain outran Nazi troops in Poland, was imprisoned by the Soviets, escaped to Japan, was deported to China and eventually made his way to safety and artistic success in Mexico.

The King Of Comic Books

05/31/2002
Staff Writer

The superhero Spiderman has made the leap from printed page to movie screens across the country, but one giant of the comic-book industry says he is still battling for mainstream legitimacy.

Will Eisner, the creator of the 1940s comic book hero “The Spirit,” is not after box-office proceeds or merchandising spin-offs. Instead he wants recognition for comic books as a literary art form.

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