New York City

Across The Great Divide

03/23/2007
Staff Writer
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.

After 500 Years, A Return To Judaism

Miquel Seguara, a ‘Chueta’ descendant of Mallorcan Jews forced to convert, reclaims his heritage.

12/24/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

More than five centuries after his ancestors were forced to convert to Catholicism, and more than 300 years after a relative was burned at the stake for secretly practicing Judaism, Miquel Segura of Mallorca, Spain, returned to the Jewish people.

For Jewish Politics, A Decade Of Declines

Civil liberties, Jewish power, unity on Israel, confidence in elected officials all took hits in a period scarred by 9/11.

12/24/2009
Assistant Managing Editor

At the end of the 1990s, the nation seemed to want nothing more than a scandal-free White House and reassurance that computers wouldn’t go haywire when the clock struck midnight on New Year’s Eve.

But a decade later, the political landscape has been radically transformed, and several important narratives have unfolded that will change Jewish life in America forever.

HIAS’ Youngest Ambassador

07/05/2002
Staff Writer
Most of the recipients of scholarship awards from HIAS are college-age. Most have been in the United States for about five years. Most come to the award ceremony with their parents or grandparents. Naomi Grodsky brought her daughter Eliana, age 14 months.

HIAS’ Youngest Ambassador

07/05/2002
Staff Writer
Most of the recipients of scholarship awards from HIAS are college-age. Most have been in the United States for about five years. Most come to the award ceremony with their parents or grandparents. Naomi Grodsky brought her daughter Eliana, age 14 months.

'To Paint History'

11/07/2003
Staff Writer
When history touched Yonia Fain's life, it hit with gale force. For 30 years he was "dragged by the storm of events over half a world," the Brooklyn-based painter and Yiddish poet once wrote. Between 1923 (when a 9-year-old Fain and his family fled Bolshevik Russia, and 1953) when he settled in New York City: Fain outran Nazi troops in Poland, was imprisoned by the Soviets, escaped to Japan, was deported to China and eventually made his way to safety and artistic success in Mexico.

The King Of Comic Books

05/31/2002
Staff Writer
The superhero Spiderman has made the leap from printed page to movie screens across the country, but one giant of the comic-book industry says he is still battling for mainstream legitimacy. Will Eisner, the creator of the 1940s comic book hero “The Spirit,” is not after box-office proceeds or merchandising spin-offs. Instead he wants recognition for comic books as a literary art form.

Faith In Abstraction

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
Museum Mile — the stretch of Fifth Avenue from 82nd Street to 104th — offers an intriguing paradox this fall. The Jewish Museum, at the corner of 92nd Street, is presenting a retrospective of works by a Jewish painter who eschewed Jewish imagery in his embrace of the universal. A few blocks south, the National Academy of Design exhibits the work of a painter who rejected Judaism, but uses explicitly Jewish symbols as expressions of spiritual transcendence.

The Age Of ‘Slamming’

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
Last Sunday’s New York Times declared that Jewish life on the Lower East Side was in its death throes. Meanwhile, a gathering at the historic Eldridge Street Synagogue proved that, at least in some corners, the neighborhood’s Jewish activity was not yet gone, just showing its age. A group of about a dozen poets aged 65 and older, and an audience twice their number, had gathered in the 115-year-old sanctuary that mellow morning for the Eldridge Street Project’s second annual Poetry Slam for Seniors.

‘MoSex’ And The Jews

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
The careers of stage-and-screen star Mae West, moral crusader Anthony Comstock and birth-control pioneer Margaret Sanger are intimately bound up in the history of sexuality in America. So, too, are those of burlesque queen Ida Mencken, publisher Samuel Roth and condom-maker Julius Schmidt. Their enterprising exploits will be on display when the Museum of Sex opens this week.
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