New York

How Green Is My Landfill

05/20/2009
Staff Writer

Just southeast of Tel Aviv, a huge mountain peak looms over the highway below, harboring swarms of flies and wafting scents of decaying garbage down its sprouting hills. The manmade mound — called Hiriya — may contain a colossal pile of trash, but the landfill is quickly becoming Israel’s icon of environmentalism: a space to recycle waste, produce energy and cultivate greenery. 

Part of the state-of-the-recycling effort at the site

Piping Up For Israel

05/18/2010

What’s that sound coming from the courtyard? 

Bagpipes? No, it can’t be. It’s not even St. Patrick’s Day.

And yet, there they are, standing near the patchy lawn behind their Washington Heights apartment building — an Orthodox Jewish couple, playing the bagpipes.

Sam and Sandy Benson usually practice their unusual instrument in Fort Tryon Park, but on Fridays, when time is short and the food is in the oven, they just come downstairs to play. 

“Shabbos siren”: The bagpipe sounds of Sandy and Sam Benson announce coming of Shabbat in Washington Heights. Yoni Oppenheim

UJA-Fed. Reduces Funds For Recession Program

Connect to Care’s budget trimmed, but charity says ‘services being kept whole.’

05/18/2010
Staff Writer

UJA-Federation of New York’s signature response to the recession, a program that has helped some 22,000 people with a wide range of unemployment-related services, has itself fallen victim to the budget axe.

The charity’s board of directors has approved a 12-month, $4 million budget for Connect to Care in the fiscal year that starts July 1, down from the $6.8 million that was allotted for the initial 15-month period in 2009-10.

But UJA-Federation officials stress that “no client will see any difference in services.”

Israel, Caught In All Its Complexities

Rina Castelnuovo’s photos, at the Meislin Gallery.

05/13/2010
Staff Writer

On Tuesday, Andrea Meislin, an art dealer in New York, was on her way to Washington. Israel’s ambassador to the United States, Michael Oren, asked her to help decorate his new home, knowing that she represented some of Israel’s most prominent photographers. But Meislin, unsure of Oren’s politics and his artistic tastes, was packing light. She was bringing only her laptop for this trip, she said, which contained images of all her artwork, instead of carrying just a few select prints. She did not want to offend him with any of her own choices.

Beth Haran, West Bank ("Harvesting"), 2009.

Israel Parade Recruits Israelis

05/11/2010

The organizers of the annual Salute to Israel Parade are hoping that there will be an unusual sight at the event next week: lots of Israelis.

Michael Miller, executive vice president of the Jewish Community Relations Council, the parade’s “parent” organization, says a special pitch is being made this year to attract as spectators more of the estimated 200,000 Israelis who live in the New York area to the five-hour, almost-mile-long march along Fifth Avenue.

Vroom at the parade: The annual Salute to Israel march on Fifth Avenue, which includes people on foot and motorcycles.

Israeli-U.S. Conservatives Still Split On Gays

Departure of two openly gay rabbinical students and three straight friends
from Machon Schechter highlights lingering differences.

05/11/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — When, in 2007, the Conservative movement’s Jewish Theological Seminary decided to admit openly gay students for the first time, the decision presented these students with a dilemma: where to study during their mandatory third year in Israel.

Traditionally, JTS rabbinical students have spent their Israel year at Machon Schechter, the Israeli Masorti movement’s rabbinical seminary, which does not ordain openly gay students.

This worried Ian Chesir-Teran and Aaron Weininger, JTS’ first two openly gay JTS students.

Chesir-Teran, a 39-year-old father of three from East Meadow, L.I., above

Cracking the UJA-Federation Shell

05/11/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Thousands of tweets. Hundreds of thousands of hits. Millions watching the video clips.

The earthquake in Haiti? No.

Is New York Blessed?

It’s hard to consider a city that sustained the worst terror attack in history lucky. But when you look at the attempts made since 9-11 (and a few prior) to cause widespread carnage in New York, you have to count the blessings. In a city that seems to top terrorists’ most wanted list, plots have been hatched to bomb Bronx synagogues, Herald Square, the Lincoln Tunnel, the subway, the Long Island Rail Road and other sites with an extremely fortunate track record of 0.

New Focus On Genetic Screening For Persians

Two research projects, new organization raising awareness
in Iranian communities here and in L.A..

Special To The Jewish Week
05/05/2010

 If you’re an Ashkenazi Jewish woman, a standard prenatal visit to the obstetrician includes testing for as many as 15 hereditary diseases that could affect your offspring. Insurance covers the cost. If you’re a Persian Jewish woman, and you want to be tested for the assortment of genetic mutations commonly found in the Iranian Jewish community, you’re basically out of luck. And quite likely, you’re also out of pocket, paying with your own money for each individual test.

Dr. David Rimoin and his research partner developed the West Coast study that screened 1000 Persian Jews.

Full-Time Teachers: Can The Model Catch On?

Following Central Synagogue’s lead, more local congregations hoping to upgrade Hebrew-school staff.

05/05/2010
Associate Editor

 In a Midtown room, several 20-somethings are gathered around a scuffed-up table. With papers, cell phones and various caffeinated beverages before them, they enthusiastically brainstorm together and critique each other’s work. 

A workshop for young writers or artists? No, this is the weekly meeting of Central Synagogue’s 10 full-time Hebrew school teachers.

Afternoon Hebrew schools, despite competition from day schools and private tutors, continue to be the venues where the majority of American Jewish kids get their religious education. 

Full-time Hebrew school teachers Greg Weitzmann, Toba Strauss and Arielle Garelleck in a weekly planning meeting.
Syndicate content