Midtown

N.Y. Sees Dramatic Shift In Population

06/20/2003
Staff Writer
A population shift of dramatic proportions is changing the face of New York's Jewish community as Russians and the Orthodox (many of them poor) now comprise nearly four in 10 Jews in New York City, according to the 2002 New York Jewish Community Study. While the overall Jewish population in the city, Long Island and Westchester has remained stable in the last decade at 1.4 million, the makeup of the 643,000 households in which they live is radically different than in 1991, suggesting major changes in the city's political landscape and the Jewish community's funding priorities.

After The Fall

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
When John Ruskay met with a major donor to UJA-Federation of New York Monday in the man’s Midtown office, multiple screens on his desk flashed with stock prices and minute-by-minute financial updates. Their first order of business was to talk about the volatility currently wreaking havoc in the hedge fund, credit and mortgage markets.

After The Fall

08/17/2007
Staff Writer
When John Ruskay met with a major donor to UJA-Federation of New York Monday in the man’s Midtown office, multiple screens on his desk flashed with stock prices and minute-by-minute financial updates. Their first order of business was to talk about the volatility currently wreaking havoc in the hedge fund, credit and mortgage markets.

Zooming In On Righteous Muslims

04/14/2009
Staff Writer
He is a headhunter in the securities industry by vocation and environmental photographer by avocation. He is a Jew who grew up in New Jersey and studies Islam’s Sufi mystical tradition. Norman Gershman came here from his home in Colorado five years ago in search of some people to photograph — and found a mission. In Midtown Manhattan he discovered Albania.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

New Broth

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
A middle-aged woman walked into J. Levine Judaica, a Midtown bookstore, one recent afternoon, looking for an inspirational gift for a friend with cancer. Owner Danny Levine pointed her to the self-help section. The customer chose one of the "Small Miracles" books, with many Jewish stories, by Brooklyn authors Yitta Halberstam and Judith Leventhal. The woman said someone profiled in one of the books reminded her of her friend. The woman, Levine says, spent "a good 15, 20 minutes" reading many stories in many books.

'Now I Am A Ghost'

11/24/2006
Staff Writer

Ten months after her son was kidnapped and tortured to death by young Muslim gang members in Paris (after her son became a symbol of anti-Semitic violence, and she began making public speeches about the type of hatred that took her son's life) Ruth Halimi brought her message of tolerance to New York City. "Ilan's tragedy was a humanitarian tragedy," not just a Jewish tragedy, Ruth Halimi told a lunch reception last week at the Anti-Defamation League headquarters in Midtown, her first appearance here.

A Bounce For Israel PR

11/12/2004
Staff Writer
Dozens of young Israelis have traveled to three continents on a privately sponsored public relations campaign for the Jewish state because Joey Low asked himself a question two years ago. Low, a national Hillel board member who lives in Purchase, found that “college kids knew nothing about Israel” and he wondered, “What can we do to change that?”
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