Midtown

Staples Of N.Y. Jewish Life

06/21/2002
Staff Writer
The Museum of Modern Art's temporary move from Midtown to the former Swingline staple factory in Queens binds the venerable arts institution to New York's immigrant history. Swingline's founder, Jack Linsky, came to America from Russia as a boy and within three decades had revolutionized office work.

Staging Vengeance

07/04/2003
Staff Writer
With her latest play, Israeli theater director Rina Yerushalmi has put herself in esteemed literary company. "Mythos," Yerushalmi's adaptation of Greek legend of the House of Atreus, follows in the tradition of Aeschylus, Euripides, Hugo von Hofmannstahl and Jean Paul Sartre, among others, who saw in the tale's cycle of bloody revenge universal themes ripe for exploration.

Jingle All The Day

Friday, December 18th, 2009

This time of the year, radio listeners of all persuasions find ourselves flipping around the dial a bit. Some like the holid …I mean, Christmas, music and are looking for more, and some of us are looking for refuge, perhaps at a news station.

 

Maybe with the widespread usage of sattelite radio with its genre channels and MP3 playlists easily sent to your car’s speakers, we end up scanning a bit less than we used to, because we can have more control.

 

Fast Company

02/14/2003
Staff Writer
Nearly eight minutes into our first date, I still didn't know Steve's last name. But fueled by orange-flavored vodka and the promise of fresh romance, he had disclosed other significant bits of information: He's a self-styled entrepreneur, 40, in therapy, and just coming out of a string of relationships with "inappropriate women," he said, meaning, in part, not Jewish. "I figured it was time to start making responsible choices."

Common Artists, Uncommon Art

01/31/2003
Staff Writer
Its creative ranks include recluses, the insane and former prison inmates, but "Outsider Art" is hardly the exclusive domain of social misfits. A tour through the American Museum of Folk Art or any number of galleries specializing in what is also known as "self-taught art" exposes viewers to a rich field of artists (including a notable number of Jewish painters) who, while untrained, display a talent for visual expression appreciated by connoisseurs and common folk alike.

Healing The Healers

06/28/2002
Staff Writer
New York City area clergy are in danger of burning out as they try to keep up with the unprecedented demand for spiritual counsel from hundreds of thousands of residents traumatized from Sept. 11. And the mental health of both clergy and 9-11 survivors is expected to worsen in the coming months from the continued stress and delayed emotional reactions.

Jingle All The Day

This time of the year, radio listeners of all persuasions find ourselves flipping around the radio dial quite a bit. Some like the  Christmas music and are looking for more, and some of us are looking for refuge, perhaps at a news station.

Maybe with the widespread usage of sattelite radio with its genre channels and MP3 playlists easily sent to your car’s speakers, we end up scanning a bit less than we used to, because we can have more control.

The Limits Of Tolerance

05/23/2003
Staff Writer
Jonathan Sacks closed his eyes and cupped his salt-and-pepper bearded chin. England's urbane chief rabbi was asked to explain the state of Orthodox Judaism in light of the publicized censoring of books about Judaism by fervently Orthodox representatives of the "People of the Book."

Diamond Hunting

05/02/2003
Staff Writer
Mel Berger is usually found safely behind his desk in Midtown making book deals for the likes of Ray Romano, Erin Brokovich, and former New York Yankee star Paul O'Neill. So it was out of character when the 53-year-old William Morris literary agent recently found himself on his hands and knees in a little-known forest on the French-German border, sifting dirt looking for buried World War II treasures.

You Don’t Look Like A Marine...

03/20/2009
Staff Writer
A few hours after a U.S. Army base in Iraq came under Iranian-backed Shi’ite rocket attacks the other day, Dave Rosner and a few friends showed up. Rosner, a lieutenant colonel in the Marine Corps Reserves, wasn’t there to fight. He went to tell jokes. Rosner, a wiry, wisecracking native of New Mexico who now lives on the Upper East Side, was part of a stand-up show that entertains troops in war zones. This one was especially tense after the rocket attack, one in which an injured soldier had to be airlifted away for medical care.
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