Miami

Portrait Of An Accused Jewish Terrorist As A Young Man

American-born settler Jack Tytell is charged with multiple murders and hate crimes. A look into his upbringing in the U.S. reveals some surprises.

12/02/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

His fellow students at Akiva Hebrew Day School, a Modern Orthodox yeshiva in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich., had Jack Tytell pegged.

He was “creepy,” one remembered, someone with “crazy eyes.” Another recalled Tytell walking through Akiva’s halls acting out imaginary combat scenes and jumping over tripwires that existed in his head only.

As their “Last Will and Testament” in the Akiva Class of ’90 yearbook, his classmates left him an “Uzi and a grenade ... and a Valium.” 

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Cops To Take Wiesenthal Sensitivity Course

04/14/2000
Staff Writer
The New York Police Department is planning to put its officers through a new police tolerance training center being launched in Manhattan next year by the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center, The Jewish Week has learned. Police Commissioner Howard Safir has held several discussions with Wiesenthal Center founder Rabbi Marvin Hier about using its Tools for Tolerance program to sensitize the nation's largest police force, which has been rocked by a series of tragic incidents involving ethnic minorities.

For Liberal Jews, Sunup On A Rare Ritual

03/26/2009
Staff Writer
At sunrise on April 8, the eve of Passover, a group of Jews from the Upper West Side will gather on the roof of the JCC in Manhattan. Organized by Hazon, the New York-based group that works for a “more sustainable Jewish community,” the early-morning risers will say some prayers, do some yoga and burn some chametz. When the sun appears over the Atlantic that morning, a similar scene will take place on Miami Beach.

Are Jewish Charity Execs Overpaid?

10/10/2003
Staff Writer
A new survey of executive compensation at non-profits shows that top professionals at federations and other Jewish groups are among the best-paid communal, human-services and international relief fund-raising organization leaders in the country.

For Liberal Jews, Sunup On A Rare Ritual

03/24/2009
Staff Writer
At sunrise on April 8, the eve of Passover, a group of Jews from the Upper West Side will gather on the roof of the JCC in Manhattan. Organized by Hazon, the New York-based group that works for a “more sustainable Jewish community,” the early-morning risers will say some prayers, do some yoga and burn some chametz.


Israeli (Cyber) Hoop Dreams

11/12/2008
Staff Writer
Steven Minns, a basketball fan in New Jersey, says he had trouble following the exploits of his favorite player, Davon Jefferson, a former star at the University of Southern California now playing professional ball in Israel this season. Then Minns discovered the just-launched Web site, israelifantasyhoops.com.

Enslaved By The Economy

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Buenos Aires — In the good years, Marcela would begin her Passover shopping a few weeks before the seders. The usual matzah and wine and fish, new clothing for her two children, some coins to be hidden around the family’s apartment for the afikoman search. “Everything,” she said. This year, nothing. No clothes, no coins.

(Jewish) Mom’s

05/11/2007
Staff Writer
Search the amazon.com Web site for “Jewish mothers” and 6,075 hits come up. Including a related title, “Yiddishe Mamas: The Truth About the Jewish Mother.” That’s the new book by Marnie Winston-Macauley, a Flushing-born author who lives in Las Vegas and set out to investigate and shatter the often-unflattering stereotypes about the Jewish mother.

Tackling A New Field

01/30/2008
Staff Writer
The social hall of the Queens Jewish Center, an Orthodox congregation in Forest Hills, will be filled with football fans watching the Super Bowl Sunday evening. But only one will be wearing a Super Bowl ring — Alan Veingrad earned it as a member of the Dallas Cowboys, who won the 1993 National Football League championship.

Congregations Without Pulpits

12/21/1999
Staff Writer
David Rosenn did not intend to become a rabbi. After graduating college with a philosophy degree, he spent three years — in Israel and the United States — finding an answer to one question: “What am I going to do with the rest of my life?” He took a variety of jobs, for anti-poverty and civil rights organizations. Later Rosenn heard about a Christian group that recruited young volunteers to work in poor neighborhoods. Where was the Jewish version, he wondered. “There was no Jewish version,” he says.
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