Mexico City

The Way We Were

02/04/2005
Staff Writer

Lubartovska Street circa 1937 was a vibrant and predominantly Jewish thoroughfare in the industrial city of Lublin, Poland. Men wearing top hats and well-coiffed women shared the cobblestone artery with horse-drawn carriages. Yiddish and Polish signage advertised kosher restaurants, hardware stores and lingerie boutiques.

Moishe House Bringing Community To Budapest Jews

Apartments for 20-somethings seen as ‘new, grass-roots model’ of Jewish engagement.

03/11/2010
JTA

Budapest — When 29-year-old Eszter Susan announced on Facebook last September that she had moved into a Moishe House, few of her friends knew what she was talking about.

Six months later the rambling, high-ceilinged apartment she shares with two other young women has become a focal point of Jewish involvement for dozens of Budapest Jews in their 20s.

There are parties at Jewish holidays, movie nights, lectures on Jewish topics, social action meetings and a Kabbalat Shabbat service followed by a potluck dinner that attracts dozens of people each Friday night.

Eszter Susan, left, Anna Balint and Zsofia Simon skype with Kevin Sherman, the director of international programming at Moishe's

Going The Distance

07/02/1999
Staff Writer
Jaclyn Murphy's dream arrived in a large cardboard box the other day. Enclosed were two plastic caps, some T-shirts and a red, white and blue sweat suit: her uniform for the 1999 Pan American Maccabi Games. The package came about a year after Murphy, 16, a senior at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, L.I., was declared free of cancer.

The Forgotten Olympians

08/06/2004
Staff Writer
In Olympic years, some People of the Book become people of the backstroke, the clean-and-jerk, and the high hurdles. The Games, Summer and Winter, serve as a showcase for the best athletes, Jewish and non-Jewish. From A (Ruth Abeles) to Z (Eli Zuckerman), names like Mark Spitz and Kerry Strug are in the record books as well as Jewish history texts. Beginning with 10 medals won by Jewish athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896, Jews have been a steady presence at the international competition.
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