Los Angeles

Monitoring The Mormons

02/08/2002
Staff Writer
Only a few thousand Jews live in Utah, international center of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints, better known as the Mormons. But, says a researcher in Salt Lake City, several thousand Jews are on the Mormon Church’s membership rolls — Jews who were posthumously baptized and converted into the Mormon faith.

Still Out In The Cold

02/08/2002
Staff Writer
Yossi Goldberg played soccer and basketball as a boy growing up in Israel, but figure skating was in his blood — his mother was a figure skater in Lithuania. That, says Goldberg, founder and president of the Israeli Figure Skating Association, is why he has devoted a dozen years to a winter sport in a Mediterranean country.

Rabbi Abraham Klausner, Holocaust-Era Chaplain, Dies 92

07/06/2007
Staff Writer
Rabbi Abraham Klausner, an American rabbi who as a chaplain in the U.S. Army served as an advocate for the needs of Jewish Holocaust survivors, died June 28 in his Sante Fe, N.M., home of complications of Parkinson’s Disease. He was 92. For 25 years he had served as spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El in Yonkers, N.Y., retiring in 1989. The first American Jewish chaplain to arrive at Dachau after its liberation in 1945, he coordinated efforts on behalf of survivors in the American zone of Germany who remained in displaced-persons camps for years after the war.

‘You Can’t Live In Fear’

08/20/1999
Staff Writer
Her two small children in tow, a 30-ish mother walked out of the Central Queens Y and down the front stairs this week. A few steps away on 108th Street, her children, who had spent the morning at the Forest Hills Y’s nursery program, announced that they were hungry. Mom gave them a few dollar bills to buy snacks from a machine in the Y front lobby. The kids raced back up the stairs; their mother trailed behind, watching them the whole way. “I never let them out of my sight — always,” she declared.

Olympic Games 2000: Hopes Up Down Under

09/15/2000
Staff Writer
Who remembers Alfred Hajos-Guttman? He was the Mark Spitz of his day — 1896. At the first modern Olympic Games, in Athens, the Hungarian swimmer won two gold medals, in 100-meter and 1,500-meter freestyle. Jewish athletes won eight more medals at the inaugural Games, starting a sporting tradition that continues until today.

Painless Gift Of Life

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
One of the guests of honor at the recent commencement exercises of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, sitting at the far left of the first row of the sanctuary in Temple Emanu-El, was neither guest speaker, college official Nor financial supporter of the institution. Dalia Samansky, a third-year rabbinical student at the school’s Los Angeles campus who received her master’s degree in L.A. the following week, was invited to the New York commencement as role model. She had saved a life.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.
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