Jews

Offensive, Disrespectful Ad

05/04/2010

The J Street ad that you published [April 30, containing an open letter to Nobel Prize Winner Elie Wiesel from Yossi Sarid, a former Israel minister of education and of the environment], is highly offensive, and lacking in sophistication.

Uzbeki Leader Talks Tough On Terror

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov praised Jews, Israel, New York and President George W. Bush last week during a comprehensive and tough speech on world terrorism as he accepted an award for “international leadership” from a Brooklyn yeshiva.

Making Jewish Strides

05/02/2003
Staff Writer
Belgrade: With some 3,300 Jews, Serbia, now unified with neighboring Montenegro, has one of the smallest Jewish communities in Europe. Like the other once-communist countries in Eastern and Central Europe, Serbia has experienced an increase in Jewish life since communism fell a decade ago, with a growing number of Jews affiliating with the organized Jewish community and returning to Jewish traditions.

The Fulani Factor

08/09/2002
Staff Writer
Lenora Fulani isn't running for anything this year, but the Marxist activist and frequent candidate (who has made controversial statements about Jews, Israel and the Sept. 11 attacks) is fast becoming one of the most talked-about personalities on the political scene. That's got Jewish leaders worried about elected officials turning a blind eye for quick political gain.

No Country For Old (Or Young) Rabbis

Three suburban spiritual leaders strike out on big questions in new Coen Brothers satire.

09/30/2009
Staff Writer

Michael Stuhlberg as the Job-like Larry Gopnik in “A Serious Man.”At the center of Joel and Ethan Coen’s new film, “A Serious Man,” which opens on Friday, is a very weighty matter. A Jewish physics professor, Larry Gopnik, faces a string of woes — his wife leaves him for a colleague; he accidentally kills that colleague in a car crash; his brother shows up, homeless, looking for a place to stay; and so on. Why him? To answer the question, the Coen’s send Larry to three rabbis, each one promising the answer to his eternal question.

That quest for enlightenment is a bit what it’s like interviewing the Coens. A brigade of publicists courts you weeks in advance, each new e-mail enticing you for the next: the first one promises you the interview;
the second that the interview will be in person. In subsequent e-mails you learn the day, time, place, and finally receive one last note: arrive early, you have only 15 minutes.

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