Jerusalem

To Elie Wiesel, Please Read Me.

By now Elie Wiesel's newspaper advertisment, which attacked Obama's position on east Jerusalem settlements, is well known.  My editor, Gary Rosenblatt, even got an exclusive interivew with Wiesel about it, which is certainly worth a read.  In short, Wiesel's letter basically said that Obama did not understand the signficance Jerusalem has for Jews.  "Jerusalem is above politics," Wiesel noted, which I'm guessing will be remembered by many as an egregious snaf

More on Elie Wiesel, politics and Jerusalem

Reading Jewish Week editor and publisher Gary Rosenblatt's interview with Nobel laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel, I can't help but wonder if this moral paragon is on his way to being perceived as just another political activist. Given Wiesel's eloquent and moving contributions to our understanding of the Holocaust and its aftermath and his stature as a moral teacher on the issue of genocide, that would be sad.

Exclusive - Wiesel To Obama: Pressure On Israel Is Not The Way

In exclusive Jewish Week interview, Nobel laureate says Israel susceptible to ‘seduction.’

05/06/2010
Editor and Publisher

Nobel Peace laureate Elie Wiesel says that in his private lunch meeting with President Obama at the White House on Tuesday, the president “wanted me to understand” his commitment to Israel. And the Holocaust survivor and memoirist wanted to share with his host (also a Nobel Peace Prize winner) how important Israel, and particularly Jerusalem, is to the Jewish people.

Elie Wiesel leaves White House on Tuesday. Photo: Getty Images

Avoid Escalation

05/04/2010

The unwritten “special relationship” with the U.S. is without a doubt Israel’s greatest and most potent outside asset. Consequently, avoiding an escalation in the current political conflict between the two countries should be Israel’s top priority.

Sloppy Language, Not Funny

05/04/2010

 It was with dismay and disappointment, and some frustration, that I read the JInsider column entitled “March Meshuga 2010.” 

Yes, I know it was tongue in cheek, and meant to be a humor column, and a take-off on the college basketball tournament. Mark Pearlman attempted to “parse all of Judaism 2010 into one Elite 8 bracket.” However, one of the “brackets” was “E. Jerusalem Settlements,” and it was described as follows: “Israel has taken yet more land in the face of international opposition.” 

Furious And Astounded

05/04/2010

I am furious and astounded as to how a paper that calls itself The Jewish Week could allow an ad that is so anti-Israel, anti-Jewish in its paper (“An open letter to Elie Wiesel on Jerusalem,” April 30).
Change your name to The Arab Week. Though certainly there is no shortage of propaganda against Israel, why you would join the opposition is beyond comprehension. I plan to stop my subscription.

 

Offensive, Disrespectful Ad

05/04/2010

The J Street ad that you published [April 30, containing an open letter to Nobel Prize Winner Elie Wiesel from Yossi Sarid, a former Israel minister of education and of the environment], is highly offensive, and lacking in sophistication.

Toward A Jerusalem Of Unity

05/04/2010

While some (too few) American Jews will celebrate Jerusalem Day next Tuesday night and Wednesday, the 28th day of Iyar, marking the reunification of the holy city during the 1967 War, Israel’s capital remains the subject of controversy among the nations of the world, and much closer to home.

Muted Optimism For Proximity Talks

Jewish leaders expect no breakthroughs from Mitchell’s shuttle diplomacy, but say they could bear modest fruit.

05/04/2010
Washington Correspondent

Rarely have peace negotiations started with such low expectations — but that doesn’t mean the indirect “proximity talks” between Israel and the Palestinians, due to begin as early as this week with new rounds of shuttle diplomacy by U.S. special envoy George Mitchell, are doomed to failure.

While suggesting that major breakthroughs are unlikely, many analysts say the talks could prove fruitful, but only if the Obama administration understands the limitations of what the parties themselves can reasonably be expected to do.

Mideast envoy George Mitchell, left, with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last month.
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