Indianapolis

At Last, A Final Chapter For Milton Steinberg

Sixty years after the rabbi’s death, a novel thought to be ‘too hot to handle’ for its tale
of the Prophet Hosea and his prostitute wife, is published.

03/18/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 

 
When Rabbi Milton Steinberg died suddenly and tragically in 1950 at the age of 46, there was a keen awareness that the Jewish community had lost one of its great literary, intellectual and spiritual voices. Steinberg was a preacher of uncommon eloquence and depth, a literary craftsman of prodigious output, and a scholar at home with both rabbinic and classic literature.
 

Rabbi Steinberg at work. Rabbi Elliott Cosgrove offers a reader’s guide to “The Prophet’s Wife”.

Sculpting A New Salt Lake City

02/22/2002
Staff Writer
Visitors to Salt Lake City during the Winter Games have seen the first signs of the city’s effort to change its public face — tree-lined mediums on major streets, a light rail system, more parks. And some visitors have met the man behind the changes — Stephen Goldsmith, Salt Lake City director of planning and fourth-generation Salt Lake City Jew.

Lag b’Omer High In Israel

05/11/2007
Staff Writer
The mountaintop city of Meron, in northern Israel, is the country’s second-highest spot, but for one day each spring it is the highest in religious passion. On Lag b’Omer, the 33rd day of the period between Passover and Shavuot, an estimated quarter-million people, from secular to haredi, ascend to the open grounds of the city that becomes Israel’s answer to the Kentucky Derby or the Indianapolis 500 — an annual Woodstock that attracts families instead of hippies. Pilgrims and tourists come days in advance, arriving by car and bus and van.
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