Haifa

Sailing Into History

08/27/2004
Staff Writer
They finally played “Hatikvah” at the Olympics. Israel, which spent 40 years in the athletic desert, winning no medals from the country’s first appearance in the Summer Games in 1952 until Yael Arad’s silver in judo in 1992, won gold for the first time this week. Windsurfer Gal Friedman, 28, who won a bronze medal in his Mistral sailing event in Atlanta eight years ago, took the gold on Wednesday in Athens, beating a Greek sailor by 11 points.

The Writing On The Wall

11/20/2007
Assistant Managing Editor

What do Israel’s left-wingers and right-wingers, religious zealots and punk rockers, sports fans and cynics have in common?

All of them apparently feel quite comfortable strolling up to a wall in a public place with a can of spray paint and leaving behind their sometimes quite elaborate messages.

Time To Fly

Sunday, September 13th, 2009

Your blogger has had a wonderful, spiritually uplifting visit to Israel, but you know what they say about all good things.

 

During a break in the International Jewish Bloggers’ Conference Sunday night, I checked in with our olim one last time to see how they had spent their first weekend and how things looked on the road ahead.

 

Aliyah Blog, Part 9 – More Bureacracy For Adi

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

On her second day in Israel, Adi Cydulkin was spending quality time with family and friends in Haifa. But unlike her fellow Nefesh B’Nefesh olim, Adi still had the Israeli bureaucracy to contend with.

 

Bill Won't Keep Non-Orthodox Off Councils

01/29/1999
Staff Writer
In the end, the fight over whether Reform and Conservative leaders could sit on powerful religious councils in Israel apparently turned on a Talmudic loophole. By a vote of 50-49, the Knesset this week adopted a bill crafted to keep Reform and Conservative representatives off religious councils, which dispense millions of dollars to religious institutions throughout the country.

Israel Fooled On Death Of Al-Dura

06/13/2003
Associate Editor
The Palestiniansí first and greatest propaganda coup of the war was the shooting of Muhammed Al-Dura, the boy whose widely seen death in his fatherís arms at the very beginning of the war (Sept. 30, 2000) established the basic Palestinian legend: the heavily armed, trigger-happy Zionists killing the helpless, unarmed Palestinian child.

Left Seen Awakening Over Netzarim Debate

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
Israelís peace movement, largely dormant since Ariel Sharon was first elected prime minister three years ago, resurfaced last weekend amid calls for a political framework for peace and withdrawal from a contentious settlement in Gaza. An estimated 4,000 Israelis took to the street Saturday night to protest Sharon's policies in a demonstration outside his Jerusalem residence. Naomi Chazan, a former Knesset member from the left-wing Meretz Party and one of the participants, said this was the first major demonstration against Sharon.

Rekhess: Israeli Arabs Must Be Priority

12/03/1999
Staff Writer
Elie Rekhess is a senior research fellow at Tel Aviv University's Moshe Dayan Center for Middle East Studies and an adviser to the Abraham Fund, which promotes coexistence between the Jews and Arabs in Israel. Born in Haifa, Rekhess, 53, served as a strategic adviser to Ehud Barak during his successful campaign for prime minister. He is currently an adviser to the Ministerial Committee on the Arabs in Israel. He was interviewed during a recent visit to the city. Jewish Week: How has the attitude of the Arab citizens of Israel changed since the Oslo peace accords in 1993?

Goodbye Zion, Hello Canaan

09/12/2003
Associate Editor
Surrender is usually less about treason than about exhaustion, and the Jews are an exhausted people. After centuries of being killed, there are Jews suggesting we die not with a bang but a whimper. Better to live in Canaan than in Zion; better intermarriage than to be thought intolerant; better oblivion than being eaten alive.
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