Flatbush

On South Beach Florida's Jewish Past Is Present

12/16/2008
Managing Editor

The elderly Jews are gone now, the ones who carried their  Yiddish cadences and stories of the rag trade and the Old Country with them down to the tip of Miami Beach. Throughout the ’50s and ’60s and ’70s and even into the ‘80s, they sat in rickety, rainbow-striped folding chairs on the warm sand, sweet Atlantic breezes tousling their white hair. Or they sat on the front porches of the many small Art Deco-style hotels and apartment buildings they called home in their autumn years, whiling away the hours in their Southern shtetl.

On South Beach Florida's Jewish Past Is Present

12/16/2008
Managing Editor

The elderly Jews are gone now, the ones who carried their  Yiddish cadences and stories of the rag trade and the Old Country with them down to the tip of Miami Beach. Throughout the ’50s and ’60s and ’70s and even into the ‘80s, they sat in rickety, rainbow-striped folding chairs on the warm sand, sweet Atlantic breezes tousling their white hair. Or they sat on the front porches of the many small Art Deco-style hotels and apartment buildings they called home in their autumn years, whiling away the hours in their Southern shtetl.

Fit And Frum

07/14/2006
Staff Writer
For a yeshiva graduate from Brooklyn, a mile swim, a 24-mile bike ride and a six-mile run — all in one day — began with a single question. Last year, after David Shaoul had run a 10-kilometer race in Central Park and the New York City Marathon, both on a co-worker’s challenge after a decade-plus of athletic inactivity, he asked himself, “What’s the next thing?” His answer was the triathlon, an Olympic-sanctioned sport that combines long-distance swimming, biking and running, all done consecutively.

Breaking The Silence

12/17/2008
Special To The Jewish Week
At this time last year, Dr. Asher Lipner had no idea he was on a course to become a grass-roots community organizer, particularly around such a delicate issue: child sexual abuse in the Orthodox community. But having successfully organized a conference attended by close to 50 survivors of abuse, clinicians, advocates and rabbis in Brooklyn in September, that, as well as a compassionate and outspoken advocate for victims of abuse throughout the Orthodox world, is exactly what he has become.

BreakingThe Silence

12/17/2008
Special To The Jewish Week
At this time last year, Dr. Asher Lipner had no idea he was on a course to become a grass-roots community organizer, particularly around such a delicate issue: child sexual abuse in the Orthodox community. But having successfully organized a conference attended by close to 50 survivors of abuse, clinicians, advocates and rabbis in Brooklyn in September, that, as well as a compassionate and outspoken advocate for victims of abuse throughout the Orthodox world, is exactly what he has become.
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