Budapest

Tim Boxer - Dr. Ruth To Rabbi Schneier: 'Rewire, Don't Retire'

06/25/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Park East Synagogue on the Upper East Side this month celebrated its 120th anniversary and the 80th birthday of Rabbi Arthur Schneier who has served since 1962.

Rabbi Israel Lau, former chief rabbi of Israel, told the 800 dinner guests that "80 is just a beginning. Moses began his mission as leader of the Jewish people at 80. So don't give up."

Schneier said he's not slowing down, especially after Dr. Ruth Westheimer urged him, "Rewire, don't retire."

Elisabeth and Rabbi Arthur Schneier with Archbishop Demetrios, Primate of Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America. Photo-Tim Boxer

Jewish Food Scene Takes Off

06/01/2010
JTA

Budapest — Rahel Raj calls herself a 21st-century Yiddishe mama.

The daughter of a rabbi and mother of a toddler, she and her family run a pair of popular bake shops here that specialize in Jewish pastries such as flodni, a calorific confection of layered nuts, apple and poppy seeds that is one of the symbols of local Jewish cuisine.

Rahel Raj’s husband, Miklos Maloschik, behind the counter at the family-run Noe pastry shop. Ruth Ellen Gruber

Hungary Cites Schneier As Noble Survivor

06/01/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The consul general of Hungary in New York paid tribute to Rabbi Arthur Schneier of Park East Synagogue on his 80th birthday recently. The rabbi, a native of Vienna, survived the Holocaust as a 15-year-old refugee in Budapest when 600,000 Hungarian Jews perished.

“He could have come away from the Budapest ghetto hating not only the Nazis but the Germans, the Hungarians in general—many of his survivors have,” said Consul General Viktor Polgar.

Elisabeth and Rabbi Arthur Schneier with Hungarian Consul General Viktor Polgar. Photo by Tim Boxer

Moishe House Bringing Community To Budapest Jews

Apartments for 20-somethings seen as ‘new, grass-roots model’ of Jewish engagement.

03/11/2010
JTA

Budapest — When 29-year-old Eszter Susan announced on Facebook last September that she had moved into a Moishe House, few of her friends knew what she was talking about.

Six months later the rambling, high-ceilinged apartment she shares with two other young women has become a focal point of Jewish involvement for dozens of Budapest Jews in their 20s.

There are parties at Jewish holidays, movie nights, lectures on Jewish topics, social action meetings and a Kabbalat Shabbat service followed by a potluck dinner that attracts dozens of people each Friday night.

Eszter Susan, left, Anna Balint and Zsofia Simon skype with Kevin Sherman, the director of international programming at Moishe's

Honoring The Many

11/01/2002
Jewish Week Book Critic

Imre Kertesz, a Hungarian Jew who is this year’s Nobel laureate in literature, often says that he’s a medium of the Holocaust. “Auschwitz speaks through his stories,” a friend of his, the Israeli literary critic and author Shmuel Thomas Huppert, tells The Jewish Week. “His main theme is Auschwitz. He stresses the fact that first of all he’s a writer. He didn’t become a writer because he was in Auschwitz but, by being in Auschwitz, he found his major theme.”

Darkness After ‘Noon’

As a new biography shows, the second half of Arthur Koestler’s life, marked by a peculiar mix of Zionism and Jewish self-hatred, was one of steadily declining reputation.

01/22/2010
Staff Writer

If you were Jewish and lived in the 1940s, to say that Arthur Koestler was on your side was no small thing. Then at the height of his renown, Koestler, born in Budapest in 1905, had become one of Western literature’s most revered figures. His anti-Stalinist novel “Darkness at Noon,” published in 1940 and still his most famous, made him one of the first liberals to come out against Communism. The book would partly inspire George Orwell, an author whose reputation today far eclipses Koestler’s.

The new biography of Arthur Koestler by Michael Scammell, bottom, revives an overlooked thesis.

Carter And Cocoa For Hamas

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008 I think Jimmy Carter is every bit the anti-Zionist, perhaps even the anti-Semite, that many Jews think he is. And yet, as a father, I liked the idea of Carter talking to Hamas.

Finding Eva

12/08/2009
In New York, it was mid-August on a Sunday morning. In Tel Aviv, it was afternoon. I took a deep breath, picked up the phone, and dialed 14 numbers. “Shalom?” said an elderly woman. “Shalom,” I replied. “And hello. I am looking for Eva H___. Are you Eva?” “Yes.” Her voice sounded guarded and cautious: “Who are you?”
Syndicate content