Birmingham

The Ashkenazi-Adiponectic Connection

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
As a month-long string of food-consuming holidays comes to an end, Jews across the world will unbutton their waistbands and perhaps hop on a treadmill to avoid the looming threat of obesity that afflicts so many Jewish families. But those with a genetic predisposition to obesity may now have another related monster to fear — colorectal cancer.

Thou Shalt Lie Low

08/29/2003
Staff Writer
"What are you doing Alabama? You got the rest of the union to help you along What's going wrong?" Neil Young, "Alabama," 1972 Alabama's small Jewish community has been watching the "Decalogue Debacle" with a mixture of grit and grimace.

Poland Calls His Name

09/29/2000
Staff Writer
Since returning to Poland last June to serve as chief rabbi of Warsaw, Rabbi Michael Shudrich has been busy trying to resolve the country’s Jewish past, and also secure its future. One moment he’s ensuring that the community has kosher food. The next, he’s trying to save abandoned Jewish cemeteries and mass grave sites left in ruins after World War II. Perhaps most importantly, the short, bearded 45-year-old Bronx-born and Patchogue, L.I.-raised rabbi is trying to help Poles with Jewish roots return to Judaism.

God Didn't Get An Invite

09/15/2000
Staff Writer
Suddenly, God is seemingly everywhere these days: on the presidential hustings, in the stands at high school football games in the South, overflowing the shelves of the neighborhood bookstore. But He/She wasn't at Cooper Union last weekend when the International Federation of Secular Humanistic Jews gathered for its biennial conference. Didn't even get an invite.

Evolution Of The Feminist Seder

04/14/2000
Staff Writer
In Richardson, Texas, they call it “Miriam’s seder.” “Hers Seder” is the term of art in Pennsylvania, at the American Jewish Congress gatherings. And in a diverse cross-section of neighborhoods, towns and cities, from the semi-suburbia of Hollis Hills, Queens, to the flatlands of Canton, Ohio, to the East Bay of San Francisco, to the deep South of Birmingham, Ala., the event is known simply as a women’s seder.

Humanistic Judaism Founder Killed In Crash

07/27/2007
Staff Writer
Rabbi Sherwin Wine, the founder of Humanistic Judaism who was known as “The rabbi who doesn’t believe in God,” died last week in a car accident in Morocco. Rabbi Wine was killed when the taxi in which he was riding in the Moroccan town of Essaouira, during a vacation, was struck by another car. He was 79. His partner, Richard McMains, was seriously injured in the accident.
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