Beit Shemesh

Four Generations, One Aliyah

Extended Far Rockaway family, in rare move, heads to Israel — and new life — together.

06/22/2010
Staff Writer

Three generations of the Wurtzel-Entel family were on board for the move of a lifetime.

Chana Wurtzel and her husband Yitzi, who live in Far Rockaway, Queens, were acting on years’ worth of dreams to finally make aliyah to Israel. They would be accompanied, of course, by their four children, ranging in age from 10 to 18 months. But Chana’s parents, Joan and Eliezer Entel, it turned out, were just as enthusiastic about the move as she and her husband were.

Then there was grandma — generation No. 4.

Mimi Glaser, 94, fourth from right, with her extended family. On Aug. 3 they’ll make aliyah together.

The Giving of the Torah

Local synagogues’ scroll donations enhance worship for Ethiopian Israelis and IDF members.

07/23/2008
Editorial Intern

Torah scrolls from the New York area are writing new chapters in the lives of Israeli soldiers and of a struggling Ethiopian congregation in the Israeli town of Beit Shemesh.
From the National Council of Young Israel (NCYI), which has donated dozens of Torah scrolls over the years, to the East Midwood Jewish Center, which made its maiden Torah run two weeks ago, this is the summer of the celebratory dance with Torah held high, a trans-Atlantic act of kindness, many times over.

Members of the East Midwood Jewish Center with members of Congregation Be’er Avraham, an Ethiopian synagogue in Beit Shemesh.

Israel’s Robust Economy Is Linked To Its Burgeoning Real Estate Market

06/08/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Even during the darkest days of the global economic meltdown, the value of Israeli real estate properties across the entire country continued to rise. The combination of low-interest rates and the limited number of affordable new apartments in major cities and towns, created the perfect real estate storm for local and foreign buyers.

Haredi Hooligans

11/15/2007
Israel Correspondent

Beit Shemesh — The haredi neighborhood of Ramat Beit Shemesh “Bet” has clean, wide streets and neat white residential buildings that house large families devoted to Torah study. Wherever you go, it seems, mothers in long-sleeved, below-the-knee dresses and dark headscarves push single or double strollers, their children well fed and smiling.

Despite the outward appearances of calm, Bet, the most religious section of Beit Shemesh, a thriving municipality between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, has been dealing with a war that shows no signs of abating.

Opening New Chapters

02/07/2003
Staff Writer
Thanks to Rena Cohen, some third-grade students in Beit Shemesh are reading "The Cat in the Hat." Beit Shemesh is an Israeli city whose public schools, like those throughout the country, were informed recently that the government, because of security expenses, had no budget for English-language books. Cohen is a biotechnology administrator and Jewish activist who lives in the Washington suburbs, and was upset that Israeli children wouldn't learn English.
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