Baltimore

Prominent Push For Muslim Dialogue

11/11/2005
Staff Writer
An Islamic elementary school from the South Bronx tours the Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in Lower Manhattan. Muslim students at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore invite Jewish students to a Ramadan break-the-fast banquet. A Pakistani man invites 100 Muslims and Jews to an interreligious dialogue meeting in his Washington, D.C., home.

Creator Of ‘Mini-Israel’

10/29/2004
Staff Writer
Shlomo Shulsinger, a Jerusalem native who came to the United States with his family as a teenager and became a pioneer in the Hebrew-speaking summer camping field, died Oct. 19 in his hometown after a long illness. He was 92 and was buried on the Mount of Olives. Mr. Shulsinger — who was known to his campers simply as Shlomo — founded Camp Massad in Far Rockaway, Queens, and developed the day camp into three overnight camps in the Poconos. The camps closed in 1981. Mr. Shulsinger retired in 1977, returning with his wife, Rivka, to Jerusalem.

A Moving Experience

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Alan Rubin has always worn a kipa, but he says it’s bigger these days. His wife, Debi, has always dressed modestly, but she says she dresses more modestly these days. The couple has always found time for their five children, but they say they find more time these days. These days are the six months since Sept. 11, 2001. The Rubins, who live in Elizabeth, N.J., say they have been on a spiritual journey since 9-11, a path that will end this summer in Jerusalem. The Rubins are making aliyah — because of 9-11.

‘Heroic’ Seders

04/29/2005
Staff Writer
Grodno, Belarus — Tsilia Brido remembers her early Belarus Passover in her Polotsk hometown, her grandfather leading the seders in Hebrew, women from the neighborhood baking their matzahs in her family’s large wood stove. “It was before the war,” she says, referring to World War II. Belarus was the first of the former Soviet Union’s republics to be invaded by the German army. Brido remembers the seders ending after 1941, first under the Nazis, then under the communists.

Going Through Hoops

01/22/1999
Staff Writer
Even by Tamir Goodman’s standards it has been an unusual two weeks. There’s the all-day studies at a Baltimore yeshiva, some basketball after school, homework and Gemara review — and the interviews with CBS Sports, Fox Sports, ESPN and all the local TV stations. Goodman, a 17-year-old bochur, is becoming a basketball star.

The Old Country, America & The Snyders

06/21/1999
Staff Writer
Alex and Anna Nashbaum were typical Jews of their generation. They came to the United States from somewhere in Eastern Europe. Sometime before World War I. Freda Snyder, their daughter, does not know the details. “My parents would not open up about their past,” she says. “They wanted to make a new life in America.” Snyder knows this about her parents: they were Orthodox. Alex, a tailor, “was a shul-goer — all the time.” Anna, a homemaker, made a kosher home.

Making A Better Place

07/01/1998
Staff Writer
With her 10-year-old son at her side, a disabled widow from Long Beach told a hushed group of 500 UJA-Federation lay and professional leaders that the local Jewish community center has "been there for us in the very darkest of times." "I have an immune disease called fibromyalga," explained Harriet Cohen, 46, at the annual Long Island General Assembly in Roslyn, which provides UJA-Federation-funded organizations an opportunity to display their activities.
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