Atlanta

Rabbis Explore Uniqueness Of Gay Shuls

06/09/2000
Staff Writer
The rabbis of the nation's gay and lesbian synagogues gathered this week at a first-of-its kind meeting, held at Congregation Beth Simchat Torah in the West Village. Their goal was to share experiences "and to find out whether there are in fact things unique to us as leaders of gay and lesbian congregations," said one participant, Rabbi Lisa Edwards of Los Angeles' Bet Chayim Chadashim, during a lunch break. The answer, she and other participants said, is that there are and there aren't.

For Men Only?

06/16/2006
Staff Writer
An elite gathering of Jewish leaders convened by the Jewish People Policy Planning Institute met this week with a mission no less grand than charting the future of the Jewish people. But women apparently weren't a part of that future: None were on the list of participants. To gender equity activist Shifra Bronznick, and quite a few of the 1,000 people she e-mailed about the imbalance, that just isn't kosher.

All The Rest Is Commentary — By Men

06/26/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, a voice for spirituality in non-Orthodox circles, devoted his earlier books to bringing God back into the lives of Jews, at synagogue and at work. Rabbi Salkin devotes his latest book to bringing Jews — the half of the Jewish people who have largely seemed lost from their tradition — back into Jewish life. Especially male Jews.

All The Rest Is Commentary — By Men

06/24/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, a voice for spirituality in non-Orthodox circles, devoted his earlier books to bringing God back into the lives of Jews, at synagogue and at work. Rabbi Salkin devotes his latest book to bringing Jews — the half of the Jewish people who have largely seemed lost from their tradition — back into Jewish life. Especially male Jews.

Unlikely Torah Role Models

11/25/2008
Staff Writer
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, a Long Island native, has spent nearly three decade as a pulpit rabbi in four states, most recently at the historic The Temple in Atlanta. Now he serves as executive director of Kol Echad, a “transdenominational” adult learning center in Atlanta.

We’re Growing, Y’All

11/19/2008
Staff Writer
Stuart Rockoff, Southerner by birth and Northerner by education, is one of the most prominent voices of Southern Jewry. Since 2002, he has served as director of the history department at the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life and the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience in Jackson, Miss. The institute provides educational and rabbinic services to isolated Jewish communities, and documents the history of Jews in the South, where nearly 400,000 live. Rockoff was here a few days after the historic presidential election to speak at Village Temple in Manhattan.

Who'd A Dunk It?

01/05/2006
Staff Writer
The Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who brought their ethnic fare to the United States in the late 19th century probably couldn't foresee salsa bagels or reduced carb bagels. They also couldn't predict that a doughnut manufacturer would become the world's No. 1 bagel maker. It's happened. The Atlanta Business Chronicle reports that Dunkin' Donuts, which bills itself as "the largest coffee and baked goods chain in the world," is now the largest bagel retailer in the world.

The Chance To Fight Back

04/09/2004
Staff Writer
Military service is in the Perl family’s blood. Pvt. Otto Perl spent nearly a year in the Austrian army from 1937 to 1938. His father had been an officer in that same army in World War I, and two of his uncles had served in WWI. Perl, a tailor, was 22 in early 1938 when he was discharged a few months before his homeland was annexed by Nazi Germany. A Jew, he was arrested and sent to the Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps for a year. He survived the forced labor and beatings and frigid weather.

Sailing Into History

08/27/2004
Staff Writer
They finally played “Hatikvah” at the Olympics. Israel, which spent 40 years in the athletic desert, winning no medals from the country’s first appearance in the Summer Games in 1952 until Yael Arad’s silver in judo in 1992, won gold for the first time this week. Windsurfer Gal Friedman, 28, who won a bronze medal in his Mistral sailing event in Atlanta eight years ago, took the gold on Wednesday in Athens, beating a Greek sailor by 11 points.

Profiling The Players

08/13/2004
Staff Writer
Many profiles of prominent athletes feature their “p.r.” That stands for personal record, the competitor’s best-ever performance in his or her sport, not for personal religion. So it’s often difficult to determine the religion of an athlete. In this issue and next week’s, The Jewish Week highlights some members of the U.S. Summer Olympics squad competing in Athens who are known to be members of the Jewish community.
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